Freemasons… Ministers of Civility?

    This is an election year, in case you didn’t notice! It seems to be all anyone is talking about, so I guess I will talk about it too! For must of us its harder and harder not to get caught up in the fervor of this election cycle in our ever increasingly media driven society. Whether its your television, computer, tablet or phone you are probably getting news alerts every few minutes to announce the newest political insult to one candidate or the other (in reality these insults are falling directly on our republic, more on that later). Members of both political extremes would have you believe the United State’s survival is hinged on a single issue, and if you don’t agree you are some kind of traitor. The only breaks seem to be when the news reports on celebrity scandals. Its no wonder ever one is on edge.

    Its not news to say that fear is the best motivator of people. Our minds and bodies are wired in such a way that fear can easily override our rational mind and our compassionate heart. This makes sense from a survival point of view, when predators waited behind every tree to attack, but in the modern world it is sometimes misplaced, and can be used to manipulate us. It has long been known that base survival instincts manifest as emotions can be used as tools to control our thoughts, limit our freedom and of course sell us things.

    screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-17-amOur Constitution guarantees freedom of the press because it’s the best way for the people to communicate with each other and their Government. When it works well it informs citizens of what they need to know to protect their personal interests, and to keep the Government accountable to the people. In principal this is a great and important part of our Republic. Unfortunately like many rights it can also lead to abuses. Much of today’s media has become a platform for retail marketing; this includes social media and with the pretense of reporting important news chooses to bombard you with constant and ever increasing vitriol. Its important to remember that you did not elect the members of the press, and while freedom of the press is crucial to our nation, it is largely a business intended to make money. If they can use fear to do that, well in my opinion, they will do that, its just good business. With twenty four hour a day, seven day a week news telling you to be afraid or angry you have to have come a long way in subduing your passions to resist. I feel I should add here that not all news media is run this way, and not all journalists are profit motivated. I wish I could say that responsible journalism was the norm but I can’t say that.

    screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-29-amBecause we live such short lives it’s easy to assume this is one of the worst election cycles ever, but that is not true. The election of 1800, between Adams and Jefferson was one of the worst. Through political surrogates they both attacked each other on the most personal issues, portrayed each other in the worst light. In those days our young republic was by no means a sure bet for survival, and everyone knew it. That said, today we remember BOTH Adams and Jefferson as great presidents and patriots and use them as examples of great Americans. This is an important point to remember as we engage in political discussion today. In two hundred years subsequent generations may well wonder what all the fuss was about.

    screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-41-amSo what has this got to do with Freemasonry? As I have shown in earlier blogs there are elements of our Craft handed down to us that are at least 600 years old. During those centuries we have survived many contentious times, and for the most part have emerged stronger. Operant Masonry survived the great wars over religion in England, as well as wars about the style of government. We survived the wars between England and Scotland, as well as England and France. Speculative Masonry survived the American and French revolutions, as well as the American Civil War. The lessons we learned during those periods of conflict continue to serve us today. A simple example is the prohibition against discussions of politics and religion in Lodge. How long would we have lasted as a guild and then a fraternity if open conflict over monarchy or parliament had erupted or debates between Catholic and Protestant religions? Not long I assure you. Our behavioral strategies go much further than simple prohibitions. A Masonic Lodge culture has evolved in which everyone gets to speak his mind on important decisions, and strong Masters prevent the discourse from becoming contentious and experienced Past Masters soothe ruffled feathers when the decision is made. We can do this because our core beliefs are based in four very important concepts. The first is to preserve the unity of the Craft, a brotherhood based in brotherly love. We can do this because we have as a foundation a belief in Faith, Hope and Charity. Faith in a good God, who will, if we listen, guide us to a better future and a faith in the fundamental good in all men’s hearts, Hope in a better world for ALL people, and Charity which calls all of us to extend a hand in friendship to all people in need, even in the darkest times. I don’t mean to leave you with the impression we are perfect, we are all of us imperfect ashlars seeking to improve ourselves.

    screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-51-amI would call upon my brethren to remember these principals in the weeks to come, leading up to our next election. Within our Lodges we have maintained, for the most part, something becoming increasingly difficult to find in the outer world, civility. This is something we as Masons can bring to the larger world. In a time of so much passionate division, men who have learned to subdue their passions can be of crucial importance. We should counter unbridled passions in debate with reason and civility, remembering that like in Lodge when the decision is made we are still a Nation, and we must cherish that nation at least as much as our opinions. As Masons we should recognize that the United States was the first nation to adopt so many Masonic tenets and it remains the best example of the world we would create as any nation on earth. We should meet darkest despair with the light of a divine hope that permeates our Craft, and with Charity in our hearts gently remind our countrymen (and women) that each person has his or her own story that makes their beliefs valid to them. We could remind our friends and family of our shared humanity, that we all have hopes, and dreams as well a fears, no one thinks they are doing wrong.

    Finally Brethren, lead through example. While you might leave the Lodge after the Volume of Sacred Law is closed, you carry your obligations in your heart. Lead by example. Become your best version of the embodiment of your obligation as an example of others. Respect the opinions of others as part of respecting their humanity. Remember that at the center of the black and white tiled floor sits the altar of Masonry. It is in balance we find our civility. It is my opinion that this is our opportunity to become ministers of civility to a world that has for now lost sight of the value of civil discourse.

    God bless the United States of America, and all good Masons everywhere.

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    Anatomy of the Closing Charge, part 7: The Closing Prayer

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    “And now may the blessings of heaven rest upon us and all regular masons. May brotherly love prevail, and may the moral and social virtues cement us.”

    In this final look at the closing charge we end the charge with prayer. First to call down the blessings of heaven upon every mason then to ask that we find love in our own brotherhood between one another, and then finally, that both good behavior and courtesy in other words civility will bind us together.

    Much like we evoke the blessing of deity “when any great and important undertaking” begins, the closing charge finalizes its admonitions to the brothers in the same way. This may seem curious at first and we might ask, why not pray at the beginning of the charge? But of course, the point is, the prayer is at the end of the charge because it truly is the beginning of the masons work as he leaves the lodge for truly great and important work. The prayer is telling in that our work requires a partnership between the divine described as blessings resting on our efforts as masons here below and that indeed there is a seriousness about our work that we should not take lightly. To have divine providence rest on us is a literary way of saying that we require divine guidance, a partnership with the divine with those present and every mason around the world that has placed the lamb skin apron around him and pledged his life for those values and that more than just our mortal efforts are needed, we require the benefit of the eye of providence to watch over and guide our every action. 

    9348dabfe6e6374d3697e5199d2c83f9At the conclusion of the charge we are at the door, our bag is packed, we have all our provisions, we have been given our instructions and we are setting out on our mission. “Our mission”, you ask? Yes, masonry is not JUST a social club nor a philanthropic organization, no, far from it. Masonry is that repository of ancient esoteric wisdom that has been passed to us from great minds from all ages, often at great cost, for the soul purpose of the improvement of the individual and the advancement of mankind. The father of our country, George Washington, put the mission of our craft this way when he said, “Freemasonry is founded on the immutable laws of truth and justice and its grand object is to promote the happiness of the human race.” Each of us are expected to participate in this grand object to promote happiness and add to that grand objective. That starts first in our own hearts and masonry teaches and promotes those virtues that aid the seeker in discovering love of self and love of others first in his own heart and then through his interaction with his brothers which then leads to others within his sphere of influence in the world at large.

    Taking on the work within the lodge helps each mason to work both as an individuals and with others for the common good. These small tasks, from serving others by fixing the coffee, to attending a youth program, a fundraising activity, and other such activities are part of learning the responsibility which makes us better prepared for taking our “grand object” out into the bigger world. Perhaps it would be good to think of lodge as a microcosm of the world where there is a safe place to learn how to more effectively communicate, take on new challenges and responsibilities of working together making us better prepared to take those values out into the world where our example can both be seen as a preferred way of living and be seen as being the difference in our families, communities, and world at large that improves them all.

    The closing charge reminds us that we are not an island, that we are a team of unique individuals with individual skills and talents who are bound together of our own free will and accord for the common good of creating a better world. This binding strengthens us, transforms us, teaches us and we become better for it, better men, useful hands in the Great Work begun so long ago by those great visionaries of the past who saw the great need in wearing the humble workers apron and have, with great courage and hope, passed on to us this work into a future world that they hoped would be enlightened, free, loving, and kind. A world much like the one we now live in due in great part to their undying efforts. Yes, there is strife and war, and violence surrounding us still, we are not blind to that unfortunate truth, but as a greater whole, we are an improved nation of good people who freely follow civil laws that keep us safe and moral laws that are motivated by love and that improvement over the darkness of the despotic past should never be lost to us. Our role as masons is to become that continuous catalyst in the world, sentinels to maintain these great ideals and values that have created the world we are free to enjoy, to promote truth that brings peace and happiness to all we encounter, to help the poor, to aid the sick, to guide the lost, and to comfort the widow and orphan, to be the light in the darkness of the world of ignorance and bring clarity to all our existence. Masonry is a force for good in the world and our closing charge is that last great reminder at the end of every meeting of WHO WE ARE.

    I hope you have found this deeper, step-by-step look into the anatomy of the closing charge of value and as you stand at the alter and hear its words at your next meeting, I hope you will hear the voices of those who have echoed these sentiments from time immemorial and I hope these seven parts will help remind you of its unique importance to our craft and more especially, YOUR unique importance to not only our fraternity but to the world. The charge is that ancient sacred baton passed into your hand to carry into the next leg of the journey east. Are you ready?

     

    May God add his light to this work,

    Most Fraternally,

    WB John Lawson

    Grand Chaplain,

    Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Washington.

    Details for Upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight

    Here are the details for the departure and arrival for the upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight.

     

    Departure from SeaTac: 9/24, Alaska 718, 8:15AM

    For the sendoff, please be at upper level of the airport terminal, Door #25/Alaska Airlines area, located near Skybridge #4. Our heroes have been asked to arrive no later than 6:00AM.

     

    Arrival at SeaTac 9/26 – Alaska 761, 8:15PM

    The Welcome Celebration will be held on Monday the 26th in the Atrium of SeaTac Airport (located on the baggage claim level, south most end of the airport). Families are expected to start filling up the area around 7:00PM. Signs & balloons are highly encouraged.

     

    Time to rally the troops! Let’s be there to send them off and to welcome them home!

    *In addition, we will be hosting a small reception at the Grand Lodge Office on the 20th of September at noon to present the collected donations and thank you cards made by Job’s daughters International and International Order of Rainbow for girls Washington and Idaho.

    Anatomy of the Closing Charge, part 6

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    “… Finally brethren, be ye all of one mind. Live in peace and may the God of love and peace delight to dwell with you and bless you.”

    As we have examined the closing charge from beginning to its closing words, we can follow a prescribed path beginning with reminders of who we are and what we have promised to do, to our corporate responsibilities to our fellow brothers of the fraternity, and then to our obligation to every other human being. Now in this final admonition, our focus is directed upward to our larger self and to the great architect in whom a great or important undertaking here below is of little consequence without His inspiration and blessings.

    It can seem almost counter-intuitive to be of “one-mind” in a world that celebrates our individuality, and may in fact evoke us to say, “hey, what about me?”, but again we are reminded as in part 4, that a society of individuals cannot stand strong and like the symbol of the fasces, each reed breaks easily when separated and on their own but when bundled together, they become an unbreakable bond, E Pluribus Unum, “out of many, one”. So we are given the reminder to “be ye all of one mind”, not that we are to think the same thoughts in the same way like robots but to bind our thoughts together for the greater good so that our individual thoughts and individual aspirations can be stronger when combined with our brothers in common directions. Masonry is an art that teaches us how to bind our lives together and yet remain comfortably within our own personal view of God and religion. As Albert Pike elaborated, “Masonry propagates no creed except its own most simple and Sublime One; that universal religion, taught by Nature and by Reason. It reiterates the precepts of morality of all religions. It venerates the character and commends the teachings of the great and good of all ages and of all countries. It extracts the good and not the evil, the truth, and not the error, from all creeds; and acknowledges that there is much that is good and true in all.” This certainly aids us in becoming “one mind”. The learned mason understands that truth can only be observed but not possessed. Each observer views it from his or her own perspective and we must respect those perspectives. 

    image005We truly are the sum of all our parts. As each of us within the lodge adds our color and flavor to the mix, the fraternity as a whole is changed for good or ill and knowing that brings a renewed sense of responsibilities to our actions. Each lodge takes on a “corporate personality” unique to itself from all its individual brothers. Yes, we share the same rituals and customs in all lodges around the world with the exception of certain cultural or local landmarks here and there, but for the most part, we all are following the same ideals and advocating the same principles, in other words, we share the same mind, a collective consciousness. The collective consciousness is unique to the mix of brothers that make up each individual lodge, leaning it one direction or another and in the same way, all of those local collectives combine to create the collective consciousness of the fraternity of the world, the Great Masonic Empire. The quality and health of each lodge depends greatly on its makeup and no amount of ritual work or superficial improvements can cure an unhealthy lodge. Only when a mason is on the level with his brother can any lodge hope to be the place of regeneration and peace that it was intended to be. Only when our minds are accepting of one another’s unique perspectives and experience, sympathetic to one another’s needs, willing to uphold the rights and belief of others even if not our own, and can work cooperatively in regard to our corporate goals, do we see the health of the lodge improve and thrive. In every way, it begins with the individual and his unique world view but like a fractal, we combine and recombine. The ritual binds us together with our common mission to create better men resulting in a better world and a perfect society, in fact the practical object of Masonry is the physical and moral amelioration and the intellectual and spiritual improvement of individuals and society. The fraternity as a whole binds all our unique attributes into a seamless whole and we gain the strength that we could never possess individually to complete the Great Work. “Freemasonry has endured not because of its antiquity, its influence, or its social standing, but because there have been so many who have lived it. The effectiveness of Masonic teachings will always be the measure by which the outside world judges Freemasonry; the proof of Freemasonry is in our deeds and it is in our deeds that Freemasonry is made known to non-Masons. The only way that the Craft can be judged is by its product. The prestige of Freemasonry lies squarely on the shoulders of each of us.” – G. Wilbur Best 

    Living in peace is not just a hope in this admonition either. We are being charged with the reminder to “live in peace” as an order. Wayne Dyer, who transitioned in 2015, had an interesting quote about the choices we make in regard to our individual world view. He says it like this, “happy people live in a happy world, angry people live in an angry world…. Same world.” The message here is quite simple. It’s up to us what kind of lodge we will have and when each of us decides we live in lodge filled with potential, opportunity, and purpose, the lodge as a whole becomes a lodge with potential, opportunity and purpose. We become what we believe we are corporately and yes, happiness is a choice. I’m not saying that life is always easy or there aren’t times for unhappiness, even sadness but doing the everyday work in the quarry of the lodge should never be a drudgery or something that is dreaded nor should we be a party to any unhappiness brought unnecessarily to any brother within our ranks. As our brother Albert Pike wrote: “The great distinguishing characteristic of a Mason is a sympathy with his kind, He recognizes in the human race one great family, all connected with himself by those invisible links, and that mighty network of circumstance, forged and woven by God.” Civility plays a major factor not only in the peace of the lodge but also within our own hearts. We need to stay vigilant and keep our behavior in check as a brother not just for ourselves but for the health of the lodge as a whole. Tolerance, long suffering, understanding, are all part of our masonic obligations. When we control our behavior and bridle our tongue, we are doing our part to live in peace, avoiding unnecessary and unproductive quarrels and when we do, the lodge benefits and so does the fraternity. When we remind a brother in the most friendly manor to do the same, we raise a guardrail of standards that aid us in keeping our passion in due bounds and remind ourselves and one another of our high and kind office. We are equally reminded by Pike, “We must do justice to all, and demand it of all; it is a universal human debt, a universal human claim.”

     In this final charge we here the blessing of God being placed upon us and our work as we prepare to leave the lodge room. Each man in his own heart and mind sees God in his own way and providing that freedom of thought and vision is one of the unique attributes of the craft that makes it the needed bridge and example for living in our world today. If only we could gain the world’s attention long enough to hear masonry’s reasonable, logical and simple truth. “That God is One, immutable, unchangeable, infinitely just and good; that Light will finally overcome Darkness, — Good conquer Evil, and Truth be victor over Error; — these, rejecting all the wild and useless speculations of the Zend-Avesta, the Kabbalah, the Gnostics. and the Schools, are the religion and Philosophy of Masonry.” – Albert Pike.

     

    May God add his light to this work,

     

    WB John Lawson

    Grand Chaplain

    Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Washington

    The Evolution of the Craft Through the Old Charges

    In my last Blog entry I laid out one way to break down the evolution of the Craft from its medieval origins to today. The way I described the development of the Craft through time was from the perspective of a man on the outside, looking in as an observer. In this entry I will take a different perspective, that of a man within the Craft.

    As Masons we enjoy a certain amount of homogeneity of the Craft, such that when we travel geographically as Masons we pretty much understand the ritual and customs of the Lodges we visit, but would this be true if we could travel through time? Would you recognize a Lodge from 1390 C.E.? 1425? 1738? To put this in perspective a Lodge in 1390 could have the grandson of a Templar in attendance, 1425 was 67 years before Columbus landed in the Caribbean, and 1738 was before the US Revolution.

    To answer these questions I have turned to what are collectively known as the Old Charges. The Old Charges are essentially the documents that spell out the rules, regulations and customs of Lodges in the time before the 1717 founding of the Grand Lodge of England. I have included Anderson’s Constitution (1738 C.E.) as a bookend to the development of Lodges. There are many Old Charges, but I have selected six (including Anderson). These six are, The Regius Poem 1390 C.E., The Cooke Manuscript 1425 C.E., the two Shaw Statues 1598 and 99 C.E., Old Rules of the Grand Lodge of York 1725 C.E. and Anderson’s Constitution 1738 C.E.

    I will not be exploring the history of these documents, as that would be a whole blog in itself, but rather will call out familiar Lodge elements first appearing in Craft development in these documents.

    My primary source for this blog is “Old Charges of Freemasonry: From the Original Manuscripts”, by WB Walter William Melnyk, Springfield-Hanby Lodge No. 767 in Springfield, Pennsylvania.

    Regius Poem 1390 CE

    We will begin with the elements of the Craft that are familiar to all of us that are found in the Regius Poem. Before I begin I have to admit that the language of these ancient documents is difficult to read. I have relied on translations and my best guesses when reading them, however any errors are mine, not those whose translations I relied on.

    This period relates to what I called in my last Blog the Operative Era, or the period in which Masons were focused on building with stone. Lodges were at this point in history job site specific and Masons moved from one job to the next.

    Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 8.48.32 AMBefore I tell you what the Regius Poem said of Masons, lets take just a moment and reflect on the life of a common person. This period is clearly the Middle Ages (476-1400 C.E.), and the feudal and manorial systems were still very much alive. This meant that the ‘average’ person had little property, few freedoms, no education and not much hope for improvement. The Black Death had just passed and the European population was decimated. In short the average person lived a short, difficult life. Now consider the life of a Mason, educated, free to travel and seek better work, free of many of the restrictions of the period. What follows is what these Masons valued and recorded in the Regius Poem.

    Geometry, we all know its central place in our Masonic culture, and it shows up immediately in the Regius Poem, as does the man credited with its development Euclid. Its importance to the Craft in 1390 is no less than it is today. What you may not know is that geometry was considered as almost synonymous with architecture. You would also be interested to find the seven liberal arts, more or less as we know them today called out in the poem as valued by Masons.

    Education being so important to the early Craft might seem odd, but you have to remember when it came to castles they were the most advanced military technology available at the time, they were the aircraft carriers of their day. Like today those charged with the design and construction of advanced technology, a castle in the Middle Ages, would have had to apply the most sophisticated engineering principals available.

    The requirements of candidates would seem familiar, only free men, only men of good reputation (not thieves or murderers), a belief in God is required, as is a healthy body (here it is slightly different than today, but the idea is the same. You must be able to contribute.)

    The requirement that a mason be a free man was a little more than you might understand as a modern mason. I have heard many say they thought it was a reflection of ideas concerning slavery in America and that the requirement that a man be free was used as an excuse to prohibit African Americans from membership. While this excuse may have been used, it was not based in fact. In the feudal and manorial systems a common man would have been ‘bonded’ to a lord and his land. You were not free to leave the manor or the service of the lord without the lord’s permission. There were not many free men, so admission to the craft would not have come easily. This apparently is the origin of the requirement that a man be free.

    Other elements you would recognize are that all Masters are considered equal, a Mason should respect the chastity of a Brother Masters wife, you must keep secrets, you should obey the law and be a good citizen (subject) and you are expected to aid and support brother Masons. Also the Steward is mentioned as a supplier of refreshment. Masters and Fellows are mentioned, but here I believe Masters are the Masters of Lodges and Fellows are the highest rank under the Master, having the place in Lodge today of a Master Mason.

    Cooke Manuscript 1425 CE

    Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 8.49.19 AMThe next document I will draw from is the Cooke Manuscript. Even though it was written very near the Regius Poem in time, there are some significant developments in the Craft. I can’t say that these elements did not exist 35 years earlier, but they were not called out.

    The Cooke manuscript offers some names we would all recognize, even if they were used differently in the Lodge. This is where we first see the name Tubal Cain and the King of Tyre mentioned. Jabal and Jubal, names similar to names we all know today are discussed. We also see the first mentions of Pythagoras and Hermes in this document.

    Much of the wisdom of the Roman world was lost to the West after the fall of Rome, but one book Asclepius of the Corpus Hermeticum (the Corpus is a collection of works attributed to the man Hermes Trismegistus) had survived and Stone Masons were obviously aware of it. The study of geometry had never been lost, nor the names Euclid and Pythagoras.

    The importance of two hollow pillars, in which secrets are kept, to the mythology of the Craft is discussed, as is the fact that Masons built King Solomon’s Temple.

    To the requirement that a Mason respect the chastity of a Master’s wife a similar requirement for his daughter is added. The use of the word “hele” can be seen in the Cooke manuscript.

    Finally, the idea that the Wardens would fill in for an absent Master is spelled out in the Cooke manuscript.

    So, while we are talking about men who were definitely stonemasons we can see elements of our Lodge and ritual existed over 600 years ago.

    The Shaw Statues 1598 and 1599 CE

    Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 8.49.46 AMThe two Shaw Statutes bring us much closer to the Craft we know today. The first thing that they reveal is the presence of geographically fixed Lodges. Kilwinning and Edinburgh Lodges specifically are addressed in the Statutes. Before this period Lodges are generally discussed as temporary buildings and meeting places, here they exist, as we know them today, linked to a location. This is probably due in part to the evolutions of cities and towns in the period between 1390 and 1598. It should be noted that in the new cities and towns the men who governed, Burgesses, were often guild members. This reflects the development of a middle class that was dominated by crafts and businesses.

    Other elements that are familiar are the presence of Deacons, the unanimous agreement of Masters, Wardens and Deacons on the admittance of an apprentice (someone different than today) and the idea that Lodges were somewhat sovereign under its master. Today each degree requires a minimum number of members to open, and the Cooke manuscript requires that that least six members be present for the operation of a Lodge.

    We also see the first mention of “Cowans”, the election of a secretary and a clear requirement of dues.

    Lodge records show that after the Shaw Statues gentlemen, not stonemasons were initiated as “Accepted” or “ Speculative” Freemasons. Some authors mark the Shaw Statutes as the date of the transition from Operative to Speculative. The last Shaw Statue was written in 1599, and we know that Elias Ashmole (1617-1692) was initiated in the 1640s. By anyone’s definition Ashmole was a modern speculative Freemason.

    The Old Rules of the Grand Lodge of York 1725 CE

    The Old Rules of the Grand Lodge of York adds to the establishment of our craft the use of the gavel (mallet), monthly meetings, strict examination of visitors and of course refreshments after meeting.

    Anderson’s Constitutions 1738 CE

    Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 8.50.45 AMThe Final document I will explore is Anderson’s Constitutions, 1738. Here we see the requirement in a belief in God, no women can be admitted, no bondsman a requirement that a candidate be of “good report” and a respect for the State’s government and laws. Other familiar developments include that Masters and Wardens be elected based on merit, officers must be fellow-crafts (this was before the Master Mason degree), there will be no talking in Lodge without the Master’s permission, there is now a Grand Master, and Grand Lodge can be called on decide disputes.

    The phrase “meeting on the level” makes its first appearance, and probably most important the prohibition against discussing politics and religion in Lodge. By in large these Lodges would be familiar in operation and culture to us. While there were differences that are significant, like the absence of Master Masons and therefore the Master Mason’s degree drama.

    Conclusion

    This exploration of the evolution of our Craft through its documents has been cursory at best, but I think it shows that even in the earliest operative craft documents we do see a Craft we recognize. It feels to me though that we tend to see these similarities in terms of our present world rather than consider them in terms of the times in which they evolved. For example, the seven liberal arts cited in the Regius Poem. That level of education in 1390 would have been equivalent to a bachelor’s degree today, and when you consider the weight and authority of a Master in 1390 we can imagine that the term “Master’s degree” might apply to the man who became a specialist in geometry/masonry after completing his education in the seven liberal arts.

    In the period of Anderson’s constitutions, less than 100 years after the reformation and the English Civil war, the prohibition against politics and religion in Lodge shows a wisdom of brotherhood we may have forgotten in today’s contentious political and religious environment and it might encourage us to tread gently in and out of the Lodge when we espouse our religious and political opinions, for the sake of that brotherhood we love.

    There are other elements of culture that do not show up in the documents I cited that have affected the development of Freemasonry. The care of widows and orphans, as an example, is a biblical injunction that was shared as standard behavior in many medieval guilds. Religious drama such as is used in modern craft initiations was common practice (even required by law) in the medieval

    guilds, as many were expected to perform religiously inspired plays in public in late medieval times. It’s not hard to imagine this evolving into degree dramas.

    Finally I have not addressed the role of the Moderns and Ancients or the evolution of the Scottish or York rites in this analysis. No doubt meaningful insight could be gleaned from the addition of those traditions. It is also possible that some of the elements I have stated originated in a particular document may in fact be present in older documents I have not addressed. I do not intend this to be an exhaustive exploration, but as I said a cursory review intended to demonstrate that our Craft as shared some fundamental traits since its earliest formal documents.

    Finally I would hope that you take a moment and reflect on the privilege of being a member in a 600 plus year old tradition that was born in a dark and difficult time, has adapted to and participated in history, science, philosophy and politics, and has managed to preserve its most ancient tenets. Let that sink in as you pin on that lapel pin, and let the weight of it inform you actions in and out of Lodge, but in particular when you consider admitting a man to our Lodge. You will be entrusting our traditions to them for safe keeping, just as they were passed on to you, we owe a debt of obligation to the men who came before us to seek the best of men, rough ashlars they may be, so that they can realize their potential as men and Freemasons.

    MSA Request for Assistance for Louisiana

    Memorandum for Lodges                                                                                    August 24, 2016

     

    Subject: MSA Request for Assistance for Louisiana

     

    The Grand Lodge has received a request from the Masonic Service Association of North America to provide Masonic Assistance to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana because of the devastating storms and floods that have ravaged the area.

     

    The Grand Lodge of Louisiana has reported that two Lodge buildings have been heavily flooded, and the building of the Scottish Rite Valley of Baton Rouge, which houses an additional three Lodges, incurred a significant amount of flooding and damage.  For example, Baton Rouge received 19 inches of rain in just 15 hours.

    More than the buildings, many Masons and Masonic families are among the 100,000 displaced.  Recovery is expected to take months, and the lack of good communication is still causing issues in finding information and victims.

    I am now asking you to join with others in helping a sister Jurisdiction as it deals with this serious natural disaster. The Masonic Service Association (MSA, a 501.c.3 charitable Organization) has established a Disaster Relief Fund for Louisiana, with all donations received to be transferred directly to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana for distribution to those in need.

    You may help in several ways. You may make your check payable to MSA Disaster Relief Fund and send to: Masonic Service Association, 3905 National Drive, Suite 280, Burtonsville, MD  20866. Please mark checks, “Louisiana Appeal.”

    You may also make your donation from the MSA’S webpage – www.msana.com — with the use of a credit card.  Such donations allow relief funds to be available sooner.

    You may also send your gift to the Grand Lodge of Washington or Washington Masonic Charities, who will forward all noted  (Louisiana Appeal) contributions to the MSA.

    Let us together pray that the Great Architect of the Universe watch over and protect the Brethren and citizens of this stricken Jurisdiction in their time of need.

     

    Sam Roberts, PGM

    Grand Secretary

     

    CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL PRINTABLE MEMORANDOM

    Anatomy of the Masonic Charge, part 5

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    Up to now, the charge has focused on the obligations and civility of Brothers to one another but in this next and critical sentence, we are asked to look outside of our tiled doors and look onward to those beyond our craft and be the difference in the world in which we live.

    “These Generous principles extend further, for every human being has a claim upon your kind office.”

    Here we are reminded that although we are fraternal brothers, looking out for one another, there are expectations for our services outside our tiled doors as well. So far, we have concentrated on our relationship within the lodge and our charge has special admonishments for that focus but now it extends our view and we are asked to look up from our mystic ties, and embrace the world around us.

    This line of the closing charge can seem almost counter-intuitive because we have clearly distinguished ourselves separately from the profane world outside and claimed a special allegiance and communion with our brothers. It is true that we enjoy a unique masonic environment where ritual, discipline and order affords us the comfort of like minds and common purpose and what an amazing and wonderful environment it is. We can clearly see that the tenets of masonry, when observed, can create the framework for a much improved social structure, however, we are of little value to the world around us if we keep these ideals hidden within the lodges and the work we do here in the quarry to better ourselves and each other are designed for us to venture beyond the comforts of commonality and set out into a world that at best is a patchwork quilt of unpredictable values and a labyrinth of confusing and conflicting ideals. It is easy to fall into the trap of becoming judgmental towards those who are not part of our order as we watch chaos reign supreme while we hold within our teachings the order the world so desperately needs to embrace.

    I like the way Kahlil Gibran in the book The Prophet expresses how we should view this generosity we are charged to extend to every human being in the section entitled “on Giving”-

    You give but little when you give of your possessions. It is when you give of yourself that you truly give. For what are your possessions but things you keep and guard for fear you may need them tomorrow? And tomorrow, what shall tomorrow bring to the over-prudent dog burying bones in the trackless sand as he follows the pilgrims to the holy city? And what is fear of need but need itself? Is not dread of thirst when your well is full, the thirst that is unquenchable?

    There are those who give little of the much which they have–and they give it for recognition and their hidden desire makes their gifts unwholesome. And there are those who have little and give it all. These are the believers in life and the bounty of life, and their coffer is never empty. There are those who give with joy, and that joy is their reward. And there are those who give with pain, and that pain is their baptism. And there are those who give and know not pain in giving, nor do they seek joy, nor give with mindfulness of virtue; They give as in yonder valley the myrtle breathes its fragrance into space. Through the hands of such as these God speaks, and from behind their eyes He smiles upon the earth.

    It is well to give when asked, but it is better to give unasked, through understanding; and to the open-handed the search for one who shall receive is joy greater than giving. And is there aught you would withhold? All you have shall someday be given; therefore give now, that the season of giving may be yours and not your inheritors’.

    You often say, “I would give, but only to the deserving.” The trees in your orchard say not so, nor the flocks in your pasture. They give that they may live, for to withhold is to perish. Surely he who is worthy to receive his days and his nights, is worthy of all else from you. And he who has deserved to drink from the ocean of life deserves to fill his cup from your little stream. And what desert greater shall there be, than that which lies in the courage and the confidence, nay the charity, of receiving? And who are you that men should rend their bosom and unveil their pride, that you may see their worth naked and their pride unabashed? See first that you yourself deserve to be a giver, and an instrument of giving. For in truth it is life that gives unto life while you, who deem yourself a giver, are but a witness.

    Our Most Worshipful Grand Master, Jim Mendoza this year has asked us all to focus on “Being the Difference”. That starts with a healthy perspective of who we are as men and as masons, what our motives are and what our goals for being a mason are. All our self-talk needs to be uplifting and healthy. Our fraternal conversations need to be void of conflict and unproductive comments. We must ever ask ourselves if we have squared our actions and are keeping our passions within due bounds. We must ever discipline ourselves to be worthy to call ourselves by the name that Kings and Potentates of many ages have claimed as the greatest title that can be bestowed upon a man in this life, that of a freemason. And we must come to realize that all of this self-improvement of becoming a better man is for a greater purpose than ourselves. Being the difference, one brother, one community, one nation at a time, realizing that we are all equal in the eyes of God and all worthy of his boundless generosity, then further realizing that we are His instruments in a world that needs our understanding, generosity, and sympathy and that we have the power to change the world and bring about the ancient hope of a perfect society. We all need to give ourselves the time to focus on the mission outside the door as well as the work within and this line in the closing charge reminds us that our work is far from over when we pull out of the parking lot because every human being has a claim upon our kind office.  

     image002Perhaps Albert Pike puts it best in what might be arguably his most memorable quote: What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal. We have an incredible institution made up of hundreds of philanthropic works to bring about a better world around us. Let us set to work and share in that love for humanity and “be the difference.”

     

    May God add His light to this work,

    W. B. John Lawson

    Grand Chaplain,

    Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Washington

    Time Marches On

    I am pleased to share the words of RW John Keliher, Grand Secretary Emeritus of the Grand Lodge of Washington, said on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the March of Unity.

    keliherTime is a river that carries in its current a distillate of everything that exists along its banks. It has carried those of us who were fortunate enough twenty years ago to come together to demonstrate Freemasonry’s breadth, to this moment, and we are privileged to be with you today. Many who marched in that first demonstration of Masonic Unity have demitted our Lodges and been received in a higher Jurisdiction. Yet they are with us still. The memory of that first March of Unity and those who walked together in brotherhood remains vivid, alive, and it warms my heart.

    Two-thousand and five hundred years ago a Greek named Heraclitus observed that the universe was comprised of minute particles that were always coming into existence and then, going he knew not where. He said that our existence was so permeated by change that a man could not step in to the same river twice. Some ancient Greek said Heraclitus was only partially right. If we are all made of atoms, and they were always changing, the same man could not step into the same river once because by the time his toe hit the water, his atoms and the river’s had moved on. Everything was changed.

    The difference between the river of time and and human history is that time constantly changes and some people cling to the past, hoping that by preserving the past they may dam up the river of time and ease the pain that always accompanies change. That is understandable, not every change turns out to be beneficial. But change is the inevitable consequence of being alive.

    Our own bodies replace all their cells every seven years but each cell contains within it the memory of its structure and function, its place in the body, and its purpose. The wonder of life is that every particle of our anatomy possesses this memory. It argues strongly that this is a purposeful universe and that we are a purpose filled people. And in Masonry we have found a fraternity with a purpose, a purpose to inculcate ideas that lift humanity up and build a just society: Masonry teaches the ideals of the brotherhood of all mankind, charity to all in need, and the fatherhood of God, our Creator. We have changed but we have maintained that essential identity.

    This is not the same community it was twenty years ago. This not the same Fraternity it was twenty years ago. Despite the anger many of our fellow citizens obviously feel, in spite of the fear – much of it justified – that the scales of justice are not balanced, this is a better community, we are a better Fraternity, and this is – regardless of the headlines in the papers and the media’s love affair with violence, mayhem, and discord – a better world – made better by getting together as we have for twenty years to recognize the the family of man is one. Like the river, mankind is a stream that carries in its current many separate particles but all are part of the same river.

    It was our purpose, two decades ago, to demonstrate Masonic unity. Unity is not the same as uniformity. We came together to celebrate the over arching principles that made us Freemasons and left us free to exhibit Masonry in forms that held in veneration the memories of our origins, celebrated the complexity of freedom itself, acknowledged the validity of Masonry’s belief in the dignity and value of all persons, and championed respect for beliefs in a Supreme Being who had created, loved and redeemed creation. Each year, the Brethren have walked together, worshiped together, shared Fraternal ties together, and, perhaps most importantly, broken bread together as Masons, one people, one family.

    One can march through DuPont but not seem to travel far but that is deceptive. This march of unity began several hundred years ago in a land divided between those who were free and those who were not. Irish slaves were eventually replaced in the American colonies by African slaves. The freedom of one people was achieved at the cost to the other of that precious right, freedom. After its vicious, divisive civil war, this society stumbled forward, segregated, distrustful of immigrants of all kinds, and polarized over religious differences and moved into the industrial revolution in which people fled the farm to work in the city, but carried with them old prejudices and only slowly, very slowly, developed a tepid tolerance for ethnic, racial, and religious differences. The road to DuPont has wound through Detroit and Pittsburgh, Selma and Watts, and while it runs through DuPont, it does not end here. It leads – well, we don’t know where it leads, not exactly, and we have no idea how long that trek will take. But we are a part of a pilgrimage to a better world. There have been many men and women whose feet, naked or shod, have beaten this path before us, who got us to this point in mankind’s travel toward a just and equitable world, and many more will follow. Although our journey may be rough rugged and dangerous, although we may be haunted by fears and uncertainties, and though we may not live to see the promised land, we will, before we have crossed that last river, have participated in the march of humanity toward its purposed destiny: unity, peace, concord, one family under God. We will have done our part.

    You, my Brethren, are a part of history in the making. This humble march is part of an epic journey and your decision to be here today ensures that tomorrow will be a better day for all of our children’s children’s children. Today is a proud day in the saga of Masonry because you are here, here in spirit of Masonic unity.

    But our journey is not over. Perhaps it has only begun. The people of Israel wandered for forty years in the wilderness before getting to the promised Land; to date we have walked together only half that time. I do not expect to complete that march with you, my brethren, not physically, anyway. But if you are here in the year 2036, the centennial of my birth, I will be with you at least in spirit. The March for Unity goes on although aging marchers may slip from the ranks. But each of you, is a part of a great movement to build a better world, one person a time, beginning with our selves. And it is my faith in God, my faith you, that gives me hope that in a day not far off, we shall be truly one people, one nation, one fraternal bond of brothers, indivisible with freedom and justice for all.

    May God continue bless, preserve and prosper the Most Worshipful Grand Lodges of Masons of Prince Hall and Jurisdiction and the Grand Lodge of Washington, and all Masons, wheresoever dispersed.

    A Speech on Unity, From WB Natural Allah

    First and foremost, as the Worshipful Master of, and on behalf of Steilacoom Lodge #2, I’d like to thank all of you for being here today. This is a historic moment, a moment that we will share together for all of eternity. Many have asked the question: “If you are all Masons, why do you need a Unity March? Why do you need this dialogue amongst yourselves?” The answer is simple…with all of the atrocities that we see happening in our current world and various machinations devising plans to divide and separate among gender, class, political affiliation and skin color, in the midst of my Brothers…I am home. Home is a place where we can discard the masks we oftentimes find ourselves wearing; where we can be free to express ourselves without judgment or the feeling of inferiority; where our views and opinions are no more or less valid than anyone else’s and a place where we can genuinely laugh and feel safe.

    Twenty five years ago our Brothers recognized the value of Unity when they set out to create what we have right now. More importantly they saw the value in each and every one of us and laid the foundation upon which we should then build our moral and Masonic edifices, together. Just as the Church is an assemblage of believers in Christ, so too is the Masonic Lodge for it too is an assemblage of Free and Accepted Masons duly congregated. But I dare say that the Church and the Lodge are so much more. They have become our safety nets, our lifelines, our places of refuge, the incubators of revolutionary thought and ideas. And although time may ravage both the walls of the Church and the Lodge, we must come into the realization that we have not only an obligation to one another, but those outside the Church and outside the Lodge because these generous principles extend further in that every human being has a claim upon your kind office.

    We all stand as a shining example of what and who we can become when we work together. But I charge each and every one of you to beware of complacency and comfortability for they are the enemies of change and Unity. We have created dialogue, we have created an exchange of information and have broken bread together…But always remember to continually ask yourselves: What more can I do to solidify our Unity? Because in the next 25 years the faces in the pews may change, so what will be said about us and the foundation that we are laying here today? I long for the day that we as Masons can be members of any Lodge of our choosing; where we can sit in any Lodge at any time among any of our Brethren and feel the way I feel at this very moment…at home. I urge you all to cultivate our Unity; to allow it to permeate the very fabric of your daily lives and to make it a part of your Masonic and Spiritual journey, for in doing so, our lives and the Craft will be an ever mindful example of the sacrifices that have been made for us and because of us and invariably allowing us to… “Be the Difference!”

     

    WB Natural Allah