Get help with your lodge website

Due to the fact than many brothers and lodges have expressed that they would be interested in help with their lodge websites, I’ve had my company, which built and maintains the Grand Lodge website, put together special packages to be available to all lodges in Washington to help out.

Below are the details, and if anyone thinks their lodge might be interested, they can fill out the following form, and we will send more information for your lodge to vote on at your next stated meeting.

-Danny Done, co-chair of the Grand Lodge technology committee.

https://freemason-wa.org/lodge-websites/

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Freemasonry: ours to use or lose!

174 lodges remain out of the 318 that have existed in our state.

Another way to look at it is nearly half of the lodges that have existed in Washington state have ceased to exist.

That’s a hard concept to understand for those who run around screaming, “The sky is falling, the sky is falling!  Freemasonry is dying!”.  No, no, no.  Freemasonry is not dying; Lodges die.  Just like fruit falling off of a tree and its OK.

I saw this happening in my Lodge (Verity 59) a few years ago except I realized that there was an opportunity at stake.  Another way to look at it is my lodge was in a crisis and “crisis” is a Latinized form of the Greek word “krisis” which meant, the “turning point in a disease”. We were certainly at that turning point: either let the Lodge die or double down on our labor.  We chose the latter and its been one of the best things I’ve ever done personally.

There I was with a handful of other brothers grasping onto that fruit as best we could to not let it slip away.  Perhaps to add to the analogy above, if a Lodge is the fruit then the branch holding it is its membership.  When a branch dries out (loses membership) the fruit withers and falls to the ground. But if you don’t have any nutrients getting to that branch, then it will be growing one sad piece of fruit.  The key was not to hold onto the fruit, but to feed it and supply it with what it needed to grow.

As I found during this crisis, there is a lot of work that goes into supplying nutrients to a lodge.  Not just the  the organization but even the building itself.  There is no way one person can effectively and harmoniously do it all.  It has to be done as a team, and each person on that team brings his special talents to the Lodge.  Those talents can and should become the nutrients which sustain the Lodge.  When you bring together a group of brothers in the work its like bees bringing together all the local sources of pollen to make the honey in a hive.  A hive working through the efforts of one worker bee cannot be sustained, it takes the collective efforts of the whole hive!

Fortunately before we had this crisis there was this little inspiring book that came out.  It was called ‘Observing the craft‘ (2010) and it changed my thinking forever by asking this simple question: “Would George Washington want to sit in my lodge?”  It was a wake up call to what we were doing.  My answer was a clear and definite NO.  It turns out that this “ho hum lodge experience” was common across the nation and since this little book was released, it has lead to the development of a new wave of consciousness in our gentle craft.

We needed to stop thinking that there was something wrong with Freemasonry and instead realized we were just one piece of fruit on the tree and we needed to focus on that one fruit.  We needed to work to improve the overall experience within our lodge so that when people were attracted to its fruit, they would find something like nothing else in life.

There is a reason Freemasonry has been around since time immemorial.  Freemasonry fosters and promotes the growth of men.  We become the fruit of our Lodges and the fraternity overall if we truly practice its teachings.

It’s time that we use our Lodges for what they are meant for: environments where we are inspired to grow!  Grow as men and as Lodges.  We waste so much time talking about what we should do instead of just doing it.

A lodge doesn’t need 500 members to function.  It needs 10.  10 brothers who are willing to put in time and work.  With these 10 active members, a Lodge can maintain itself.  With 10 members, a Lodge can practice true philosophical and fraternal Freemasonry.

The next time someone starts to talk negatively about the craft in your lodge give him this scenario.  If we Washington masons are down to 174 from a total of 318 lodges, we are still more successful than the average profit driven restaurant.  Consider how many 1,000s of restaurants have opened and closed in Washington.  According to a study by Ohio State University, 60% of restaurants do not make it past their first year, and 80% go under in five years.  We Freemasons must be doing something right because we have lodges still active today that have existed prior to Washington the territory let alone a state!!  (See Olympia Lodge No. 1 history).  Olympia Lodge is not only the oldest Masonic Lodge in the state, it is its oldest organization period.  We need to take pride and ownership of these facts.  We need to realize it has taken countless brothers years upon years silently laboring in the quarries to put together this beautiful structure we now get to call our own.

Instead of looking at our Fraternity in a pessimistic way, we need to look at the positives.  If we want to make it a better, richer experience, we need to look at what we are contributing to our own Lodge.  Then when that new candidate comes along and discovers Freemasonry, he will find that its fruit is like nothing else in the world.

 

Freemasonry is a verb!

They say Freemasonry is dying, that its glory days are long past.  They say that people are just too busy for our gentle craft and worse yet, that the younger generations of today have no interest in becoming masons.  What if statements like these were really just excuses for the real problems that we face?  What if the truth is that men today do come to our portals seeking the magic and mystery they hear about our fraternity and instead what they find is a poorly attended, mismanaged organization that is neither welcoming nor fulfilling?

What men expect to happen when they first enter a Masonic temple is of course dependent on variables we have no control over.  What men actually experience is a different story and not only is it something we control but it is our responsibility to control it!  From the very first moment someone knocks on our door whether it be through an email, a phone call or a brief conversation in passing, it should be treated as a serious inquiry.  Even if the person is never heard from again, it is our responsibility to create a serious dialogue about the craft.  Why?  Because if it is not serious to us, then how can we hope to bring in serious candidates from the outside world amidst its concerns?

Look around at the modern world.  We have access to more types of entertainment and excitement today than could have been imagined even a few decades ago.  Our progress with technology has brought us many useful things, but nothing can compare to the power of the internet.  On an information and communications level, it has completely connected us across the globe to an extent never experienced before in human history.  To take it a step further, many people today are equipped with smart phones that are arguably the most powerful tool man has ever carried around with him.  With a few taps of the screen, you can literally see, learn and do anything, not to mention instantly communicate with countless people!  If someone were so inclined, they could even (tongue in cheek) obtain the secrets of Freemasonry!  <Insert sinister music>

<Transition to uplifting peaceful music> The good news for Freemasonry is that with all these advents of technology, mankind still grasps for something to hold on to in the darkness of his own existence.  Indeed, with all our modern technology, we are still searching for meaning in our lives just as we did millennia ago.  How we discover “meaning” today depends on a multitude of conditions but the energy we put into finding it constitutes our very lives.  To put it simply, who we are is still very much defined by what we do.

Some men find themselves in sports or in raising a family or in their career.  Others find themselves in their marriage, a hobby or wealth.  For those men who can’t find all that they are searching for in the material world, many are driven inward in search for something more meaningful called truth.  In Freemasonry we call this truth, “Light”.  When a mason begins his search for Light, his progress is dependent on two factors.  One is his direct access to men already in possession of it and two is his willingness to work for it (as the others did).

This willingness to work and the desire to improve one’s work are what really distinguish a master from an apprentice and an initiate from the profane.  When we as masons actively take up this work, we make Freemasonry a verb and continue the Great Work that truly brings glory to God and this ancient fraternity.

While a smart phone is the most powerful tool that technology has brought us, one of the things that it cannot do for us is this work.  The internet can bring candidates to the door of a Masonic Lodge, but it cannot and will not ever be able to initiate a man into true Masonic light.  Only active Freemasons can do that and as long as there are those willing to engage in this work, Freemasonry will maintain its sacred position in the world.

Our Values

  • Tolerance
    • The fraternity values religious, ethnic, cultural, social, and education difference. We respect the opinions of others and strive to improve and develop as human beings.
  • Ethics
    • Our lives are based on honor and integrity, and we believe that honesty, compassion, trust, and knowledge are important.
  • Family
    • We strive to be better spouses, parents, and family members and are committed to protecting the well being of our members and their families, especially when they are in need.
  • Personal Growth
    • Our continuous pursuit of knowledge, ethics, spirituality, and leadership brings more meaning to our lives.
  • Philanthropy
    • We make a difference in our communities through charitable giving, community service, and volunteerism.
  • Freedom
    • Masons value the liberties outlined in the U.S. Constitution and continually promote freedom of speech and expression, freedom to worship a Supreme Being in an individual way, and other important liberties.