• If you took the PILM exam in July or early August, please contact ctdcompton@aol.com with your contact info.

Details for Upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight

Here are the details for the departure and arrival for the upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight.

 

Departure from SeaTac: 9/24, Alaska 718, 8:15AM

For the sendoff, please be at upper level of the airport terminal, Door #25/Alaska Airlines area, located near Skybridge #4. Our heroes have been asked to arrive no later than 6:00AM.

 

Arrival at SeaTac 9/26 – Alaska 761, 8:15PM

The Welcome Celebration will be held on Monday the 26th in the Atrium of SeaTac Airport (located on the baggage claim level, south most end of the airport). Families are expected to start filling up the area around 7:00PM. Signs & balloons are highly encouraged.

 

Time to rally the troops! Let’s be there to send them off and to welcome them home!

*In addition, we will be hosting a small reception at the Grand Lodge Office on the 20th of September at noon to present the collected donations and thank you cards made by Job’s daughters International and International Order of Rainbow for girls Washington and Idaho.

MSA Request for Assistance for Louisiana

Memorandum for Lodges                                                                                    August 24, 2016

 

Subject: MSA Request for Assistance for Louisiana

 

The Grand Lodge has received a request from the Masonic Service Association of North America to provide Masonic Assistance to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana because of the devastating storms and floods that have ravaged the area.

 

The Grand Lodge of Louisiana has reported that two Lodge buildings have been heavily flooded, and the building of the Scottish Rite Valley of Baton Rouge, which houses an additional three Lodges, incurred a significant amount of flooding and damage.  For example, Baton Rouge received 19 inches of rain in just 15 hours.

More than the buildings, many Masons and Masonic families are among the 100,000 displaced.  Recovery is expected to take months, and the lack of good communication is still causing issues in finding information and victims.

I am now asking you to join with others in helping a sister Jurisdiction as it deals with this serious natural disaster. The Masonic Service Association (MSA, a 501.c.3 charitable Organization) has established a Disaster Relief Fund for Louisiana, with all donations received to be transferred directly to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana for distribution to those in need.

You may help in several ways. You may make your check payable to MSA Disaster Relief Fund and send to: Masonic Service Association, 3905 National Drive, Suite 280, Burtonsville, MD  20866. Please mark checks, “Louisiana Appeal.”

You may also make your donation from the MSA’S webpage – www.msana.com — with the use of a credit card.  Such donations allow relief funds to be available sooner.

You may also send your gift to the Grand Lodge of Washington or Washington Masonic Charities, who will forward all noted  (Louisiana Appeal) contributions to the MSA.

Let us together pray that the Great Architect of the Universe watch over and protect the Brethren and citizens of this stricken Jurisdiction in their time of need.

 

Sam Roberts, PGM

Grand Secretary

 

CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL PRINTABLE MEMORANDOM

A Speech on Unity, From WB Natural Allah

First and foremost, as the Worshipful Master of, and on behalf of Steilacoom Lodge #2, I’d like to thank all of you for being here today. This is a historic moment, a moment that we will share together for all of eternity. Many have asked the question: “If you are all Masons, why do you need a Unity March? Why do you need this dialogue amongst yourselves?” The answer is simple…with all of the atrocities that we see happening in our current world and various machinations devising plans to divide and separate among gender, class, political affiliation and skin color, in the midst of my Brothers…I am home. Home is a place where we can discard the masks we oftentimes find ourselves wearing; where we can be free to express ourselves without judgment or the feeling of inferiority; where our views and opinions are no more or less valid than anyone else’s and a place where we can genuinely laugh and feel safe.

Twenty five years ago our Brothers recognized the value of Unity when they set out to create what we have right now. More importantly they saw the value in each and every one of us and laid the foundation upon which we should then build our moral and Masonic edifices, together. Just as the Church is an assemblage of believers in Christ, so too is the Masonic Lodge for it too is an assemblage of Free and Accepted Masons duly congregated. But I dare say that the Church and the Lodge are so much more. They have become our safety nets, our lifelines, our places of refuge, the incubators of revolutionary thought and ideas. And although time may ravage both the walls of the Church and the Lodge, we must come into the realization that we have not only an obligation to one another, but those outside the Church and outside the Lodge because these generous principles extend further in that every human being has a claim upon your kind office.

We all stand as a shining example of what and who we can become when we work together. But I charge each and every one of you to beware of complacency and comfortability for they are the enemies of change and Unity. We have created dialogue, we have created an exchange of information and have broken bread together…But always remember to continually ask yourselves: What more can I do to solidify our Unity? Because in the next 25 years the faces in the pews may change, so what will be said about us and the foundation that we are laying here today? I long for the day that we as Masons can be members of any Lodge of our choosing; where we can sit in any Lodge at any time among any of our Brethren and feel the way I feel at this very moment…at home. I urge you all to cultivate our Unity; to allow it to permeate the very fabric of your daily lives and to make it a part of your Masonic and Spiritual journey, for in doing so, our lives and the Craft will be an ever mindful example of the sacrifices that have been made for us and because of us and invariably allowing us to… “Be the Difference!”

 

WB Natural Allah

A Brother’s Plea

VWB Cameron M. Bailey
Deputy of the Grand Master District 17 F&AM of Washington

Like you, I knelt before the Altar of God and while there I made a Sacred and Solemn vow.  I vowed to hasten to the relief of any Freemason who gave a certain sign or uttered certain words.  This vow wasn’t limited by the length of my Cable Tow, or by any other factor beyond my own probable death.  I, like you, am given no choice but to respond.  Doing so is my most Sacred duty as a Freemason.

Well, in all my years in Freemasonry, I’ve never seen that sign given, nor heard those words uttered, except during a Degree, or when practicing for one.

I did however hear them spoken this past week though.  On national television.  I imagine that all of you have heard them by now too.

It was a plea, from a Brother, begging for Brotherhood.

I knew, instantly, that we must, collectively and as individuals respond.

I didn’t however, know how to do so, and in everything I was able to read about it, I saw that clearly everyone else was as confused about how we could respond as I was.  Clearly, we as Freemasons want to rush to our Brothers aid, but we don’t know how.

I have given this a tremendous amount of thought since hearing those words, and I hope that my thoughts are valuable to you.

What we know is that the Brother in question is from a legitimate and Recognized Grand Lodge.  His claim upon us is valid.  What I don’t know, is what his particular rank may be.  I’ve heard everything from DDGM to PGM.  For purposes of this newsletter, I’ll refer to him as Brother.  Not to offend, but simply out of my own ignorance as to what his full title might be.

Beyond that, I think I should point out that my Obligation, our Obligation to him is the same, it matters not if he is his Jurisdiction’s newest Master Mason, or their Grand Master.

This Brothers utterance of those specific words are in many ways like “A Shot Heard Round The World.”  Freemasons everywhere, Freemasonry as a whole, will either heed his plea with real action, or we will prove that our declining numbers and influence has rendered our Fraternity ineffective and powerless.

Our Brother has given us an extreme challenge.

It is however a challenge that Freemasonry is uniquely suited to answer.  This Brothers plea was against hatred, intolerance, and violence.  As the only organization in the world that seeks to unite all men into a single Brotherhood, irrespective of national origin, political creed, religious belief, color, and all other manufactured divisions, Freemasonry can stand against hatred and violence.  Freemasonry can and does teach the Brotherhood Of Man, Under The Fatherhood Of God.  Currently we teach this doctrine of Light to ourselves, now we must teach it to the wider world as well.

It is this teaching that makes Freemasonry, in the words of Albert Pike, “The Great Peace Society In The World.”

To head this Brothers plea, his plea that we all reach out and hold each other with the S.:G.: of the L.:P.: we must take action.  Serious action.

In my view, the first thing we must do, as Freemasons, is expunge racism from within our own ranks.  I am proud to be a member of the very first Grand Lodge in this nation to recognize the truth that a man of color can be a Freemason.  That action taken by our Grand Lodge so long ago didn’t hold, but we can be proud that our Grand Lodge tried.

I am also however ashamed that there still exist a small handful of United States Grand Lodges that practice racism, and prove that they do so by their refusal to recognize Prince Hall Freemasonry.

Racism is the real reason that some Grand Lodges don’t recognize Prince Hall.  It has nothing whatsoever to do with nonsensical notions such as Exclusive Territorial Jurisdiction that isn’t even practiced in other countries.  Ignorance fuels racism and an institution that teaches the importance of Knowledge, Learning, and Light can not allow such ignorance to exist within our ranks.

It is my sincere hope, that much sooner than later, Grand Lodges around the world take steps to no longer Recognize that handful of Grand Lodges in the United States that refuse to recognize Prince Hall as Legitimate Freemasonry.

Those Grand Loges should not be Recognized as practicing Legitimate Freemasonry, because they are not in actuality doing so.  Any Grand Lodge that refuses to take an otherwise fully qualified Brother by the hand of Brotherhood because of his racial origins is not practicing Freemasonry.

If we do not purge these rogue Grand Lodges from our ranks, the rest of us will someday soon loose any legitimacy in the eyes of the public, and eventually our own membership.

If current Standards of Recognition will not allow racist Grand Lodges within the United States to be purged from the rolls of those that are Recognized, then the Standards must be changed.

Secondly, we must, each of us, as individual Freemasons, tone down our political rhetoric.

I do not care what side of the political fence you are on.  It is not proper, or Masonic to refer to the President of the United States as a Traitor.  To refer to the Republican nominee as a Lunatic, or the Democratic nominee as a Bitch.

Those insane and radical comments do nothing but fuel the division this nation is suffering under, and that division is what is driving the violence we see every day.  Not all young black men are thugs.  Not all police officers are racists.  Not all Trump supporters hate people from Mexico, and not all Clinton supporters excuse criminal activity.  In fact, in all of these cases, only a tiny minority are or do.

You would never know it from the rhetoric.  The rhetoric paints everything, and everyone with a single broad brush.  Those who repeat such rhetoric, as if it were fact, do nothing but proclaim their own ignorance to the world.

As Freemason’s, let’s not do that.  If we have done it, let’s stop.  If we haven’t, let’s make sure that we don’t start.  Let us recognize that the overwhelming majority of people, on the Right and on the Left are good people who want nothing more but a better future for their children.

Let us also be smart enough to recognize that artificial divisions within our society are extremely profitable for our political class.  You can trust me on this, I am after all a member of that political class, I understand how it works.

It doesn’t matter what the issue is, political groups just want to divide society into two halves.  They manufacture an issue, get folks all outraged about it, and then raise shockingly huge sums of money to ‘fight’ whatever it may be.

Take the ‘transgender bathroom issue’ that was such a hot topic earlier this year.  It wasn’t a real issue, I assure you that transgender folks have been using the bathroom that matches their appearance for decades and decades.  All of the sudden though, it was an ISSUE, there was OUTRAGE, and millions upon millions of dollars were raised by both sides so that they could ‘fight’ to ‘protect’ whatever side one happened to be on.

These nonsensical ‘issues’ are created by the political class, simply to create outrage, because that translates to dollars.  Those who create these ‘issues’ don’t see folks who give them money as people to protect, they see them as pawns.

Don’t be a pawn, and don’t post hateful rhetoric that divides our nation and our world when we should be working to unite it.

Freemasonry teaches the Brotherhood of Man, Under the Fatherhood of God.  By doing so it unites men of every nation, every political affiliation, every religious belief.

Let us, as individual Freemasons stand against division and against violence.  Let us stand for Brotherhood and unity.

Our individual stand might not be very powerful, but our families and our friends may learn from our example, and may start to stand with us as well.

Even more importantly, if millions upon millions of Freemasons all stand together, stand against violence in all its forms, stand for peace, stand in opposition to discord and for unity.  We will, as a Fraternity make a difference.

We will have heeded our Brother’s call.

 

VWB Cameron M. Bailey
Deputy of the Grand Master District 17 F&AM of Washington

Thinking of Running for an Elected Position?

Brethren of the Jurisdiction of Washington: Are you interested in putting your name forward for consideration as our next Junior Grand Warden or Grand Secretary? How about serving on the Grand Lodge Building Association or maybe as a Trustee of Washington Masonic Charities? If so, you will want to attend an informational session being hosted by the Grand Master at the Grand Lodge Office on Sunday, August 7th, from Noon to 3:00. This will be a great opportunity to find out about each position in great detail, the expected commitment of personal time & resources, and to ask questions. If you are married, you should also bring your spouse as your decision to serve will impact her as well. If you are planning on attending, please email chantal@freemason-wa.org. As your Statement of Availability will be due in the Grand Lodge Office by September 1st, you will want to make the time to attend this informational session.

Grand Lodge of Washington: 2016 Lodge Leadership Retreat Keynote Address

WB Owen Shieh delivered the following keynote address at our Lodge Leaders Retreat on March 19th. WB Owen is the current Worshipful Master of Honolulu Lodge.

Grand Lodge Officers, fellow Worshipful Masters, Wardens, Deacons, Brethren, and Ladies… Thank you for your hospitality here in Washington and for inviting me here to speak and enjoy fellowship with you all. On behalf of the brethren of Honolulu Lodge, I say, “Aloha!”

Owen Shieh, Worshipful Master Honolulu Lodge, F.&A.M.

Owen Shieh, Worshipful Master Honolulu Lodge, F.&A.M.

I’d like to speak with you this evening about something we all care deeply about… something that I know strikes a positive chord in all of us deep down, because we wouldn’t be here this weekend were it not for this shared experience. I would like to talk about Freemasonry as a journey – a journey not only through our fraternity as an organization, but one of finding personal growth and meaning in an otherwise complex world.

We can spend countless hours discussing the logistics of running a lodge, debating how best to address membership retention, talking about the history and purpose of our fraternity… but the
only guarantee for the future success of our fraternity rests with one word: inspiration. The one thing that must underlie everything that we do as leaders of our respective lodges is to inspire future generations of Masons to contribute their talents to our fraternity. One way to ignite such inspiration among our brethren is to actively consider Masonry as a journey.

Perhaps Brother Antoine de Saint-Exupery captured this idea best when he said the following: “If you want to build a ship, don’t herd people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather, teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.”

I think our brethren and ladies here in this room who are teachers can relate to this easily… Students who want to learn end up learning much more than students who feel forced to do so.

In many ways, this is why Masons in general have the rule of not recruiting, in the hopes that those who knock on our doors are motivated by a higher purpose. BUT, that can’t just be it! Effective lodge leadership requires that we actively inspire our brethren to care about the journey or voyage ahead, to “long for the endless immensity of the sea” of Masonic knowledge and fellowship. Once we do that, then everything else, including membership retention, education, charity, and all other activities will happen much more naturally.

So, what is a journey? Simply put, a journey is an activity where you go from one place to another. Journeys can be physical, or they can be more abstract and philosophical. Masonry is both. It is a journey to the East within the officer’s line, but more importantly, it is a journey of self-improvement, of fellowship, and toward the attainment of wisdom or as it is sometimes called: enlightenment.

If you think about the greatest journeys of all time… Whether it is Odysseus’ long voyage home after the Trojan War, or Brothers Lewis and Clark’s expedition across the American West, or Brother Buzz Aldrin’s trip to the moon …or Luke Skywalker’s quest to save the Jedi… They all have the same components:

1) First, the main character meets an abrupt change or transformation that forces him outside his comfort zone. He may have an expectation of what is to come, but he is also ready for surprises along the way.

2) Second, he meets many difficult challenges over a period of time that tests his mental and physical limits.

3) Third, he endures, perseveres, and overcomes those challenges and becomes a “hero.” He learns about the people and places along the way as well as his own responses to each of the unique challenges. As a result, he learns about himself.

4) Finally, he reaches his destination, but the final scene is often a surprise that is unexpected. Yet the journey was fulfilling. It was rewarding in some way.

Without going into the details of our ritual, think about all of our degrees as a whole. Taken together, don’t they all have these four aspects of a journey? Every candidate, before he turns in a petition to join your lodge, has an idea or expectation for what Masonry is or should be. We all know that Masons first become Masons in our hearts, so how well we as lodge leaders can identify and fulfill the expectations of our incoming brethren will determine the future success of our lodges. So pull your candidates aside and ask, “What inspired you to become a Mason?” Everyone has a story. Effective mentoring of a brother cannot begin until the mentor understands the story of his mentee. If our new members are to cross the vast sea of Masonic wisdom, then mentorship is that boat that enables the candidate to find his way.

So, how did I start my journey?

Well, unlike many other Masons, I had no family history in our fraternity. I first heard about Freemasonry from my best friend in college, Brother Daniel Herr of Truckee Lodge No. 200 in California. Back in college, we would often suffer through our calculus problem sets together. And during those late nights, we would often find ourselves lost in philosophical conversation. Years later, when Dan became a Mason, he started hinting at how I would enjoy being a part of this fraternity as well. I didn’t pay too much attention to it at first, since I didn’t know anything about Freemasonry except through the limited discussion we had about it in my high school history class. But there was one event in my life that inspired me to dig a little deeper…

Back when I lived in Oklahoma before moving to Hawaii, Dan came to visit me for a few days to go storm chasing (that’s what meteorologists do for fun in Oklahoma). A lull in the storms implied fair weather and relative boredom in the southern plains. So during one of those “rest” days, Dan suggested that we go on a bike ride through my low-key town of Norman. Norman was a college town – home of the Sooners – but compared to the mountains of northern California where Dan was from, it was devoid of any major form of outdoor recreation much beyond hunting and fishing. I was a bit surprised by Dan’s request to go cycling. “Where do you want to go?” I asked.

“So what? Does it matter?” Dan responded, looking at me with a slight hint of consternation.

“Well, then where do you want to go?” I asked again, not finding it worthwhile to go anywhere in Norman without a purpose.

“I don’t know,” he said casually, not seeming to care about my concern.

“So, do you want to pack a lunch or something? Maybe do a picnic at a nearby park? Or maybe we can check out the area by the small airport on the north side of town?” I suggested, trying to come up with some purpose for the bike ride.

Dan simply turned and walked out with a bicycle in the garage. “You coming or not?” he asked.

Well, considering he was the guest, it would have been totally unbecoming of me as the host not to have at least tried my best to entertain, so I dropped my doubts and decided to tag along. “Alright, fine,” I accepted reluctantly.

And so, we started our bike ride to… nowhere in particular. We followed a road north through town, sped through several puddles left by the rain shower earlier in the day, and took turns in the lead. We made it to the northern outskirts of town near a municipal airport and tested our skills in tackling mud puddles on our mountain bikes. We explored unfamiliar roads and parts of town to which I had never been. I was fascinated by the various convenience stores, small businesses, churches, and unfamiliar schools that were tucked away in the humble corners of town. Dan and I shared the details of our lives since we graduated from college, stories from childhood, and our hopes for the future.

After over two hours of riding around town, we returned to my house and cleaned up. Between the new sights, the good conversation, and the cool breeze on my face, I had completely forgotten about why we went on the bike ride in the first place! And yet, I enjoyed every moment of it. I soaked in all the nuances of sight and sound. I learned things about the City of Norman that I did not know before. Although we were already good friends, through our conversation during the bike ride, I learned even more about who Dan was as a person and how that fit with his life goals. But most importantly, I learned about myself. I learned about my habits. I learned about my usual mindset. I learned about my reactions to new places and new ideas. I learned to challenge myself, not physically, but mentally – all within the space of two hours during a random bike ride around town.

The next day, we had lunch before I had to take Dan to the airport to catch his return flight. During a pause in conversation, Dan looked at me and said, “Because you didn’t know where you were supposed to go, you never would have gone on that bike ride, huh?” That comment completely caught me by surprise. I thought about it… then let out a sigh, grinned, and gave a slight nod.

On our way to the Oklahoma City airport, I finally began to realize some of what I had learned through the bike ride, although the significance of those lessons would not hit me until years later. “People are so strongly attached to their goals in life that they completely miss out on the journey,” Dan said to me in the car. “Goals are good to have and all, but when we sacrifice so much just so that we can get something, when we don’t even know if that thing is really what we need or want in life, then what are we doing? We’re living for a dream but not really living.” As I drove into the airport departures area, Dan summarized his message with these words:

“If, instead of concerning yourself with the score of the game, you concentrate your whole-hearted efforts on doing the best that you possibly can in your role that moment, regardless of your task – living in that moment, that minute, that second – when it comes to the end of the game, you will have achieved more and scored more than you previously thought possible.”

~ Daniel Herr

This quote hit me hard. I did not know what to say but “thank you,” as I dropped Dan off at the curb. He pointed at my head and responded, “It’s all you!” as if to say, “It’s all in your head.” He turned and left. Usually, when we hear “it’s all in your head,” we assume it’s “false” or “opinion,” but in reality, as we discussed in our earlier class about Masonic symbolism, impressions are indeed reality. What’s in someone’s head manifests as reality for that person, whether we like it or not! I may not have known it at the time, but through the bike ride, Dan had taught me the meaning of symbolism! And he was right… He didn’t actually teach me anything; he simply set up the conditions properly so that I could learn a valuable lesson for myself. It really was in my head! And is what mattered. I took that bike ride as a symbol for my life without knowing it, and all Dan did was indirectly point that out to me.

With that epiphany, I decided to petition Norman Lodge No. 38 for membership, and the rest is history. What Dan did, without being aware of it at the time, was inspire me to not only join Freemasonry, but to realize that everything around us – even something as simple and as mundane as a bike ride through town – can be used as a symbol to teach us the most important lessons in life. So imagine the possibilities if we can truly master the art and the science of applying Masonic symbolism to our daily lives! By applying this methodology to symbols of our three degrees, we can similarly inspire a new brother to apply the lessons of his Masonic journey to his daily life. When he masters that, then I promise you, you will have a Mason for life and retention will never be an issue with that brother!

So the goal of a mentor is to inspire his mentee to understand his Masonic journey. I remember one night when I was a Fellow Craft, while sitting in a car with my mentor in Oklahoma in the lodge parking lot, I asked him excitedly, “What do I get to do when I’m a Master Mason?!” He thought about it, then responded, “Well, you get to vote… you get to listen to the bills… you get to listen to meeting minutes getting read…” So basically, nothing too horribly exciting. But then it hit me – Masonry is all about the journey of becoming a Master Mason! There are plenty of organizations out there that you can join for community service, for social networking, and other benefits, but Masonry is the only organization of its kind centered upon the long process of initiation! The act of becoming a Master Mason is the purpose of Masonry! So given the importance of facilitating our candidates’ journeys through the Craft, through much trial and error, I have found that the best way to mentor and inspire our new brothers is to do the following:

1) Match candidates with compatible mentors. A good way to start is to either give the candidate a choice in who should serve as his mentor, or to give preference to the Master Mason who officially signs and recommends the candidate on his petition. This ensures that the candidate is not only learning about Masonry, but is also making a friend.

2) Meet once a week outside of lodge for at least an hour. This enables the mentor to build a relationship and a deeper friendship with the candidate outside of a lodge setting. This becomes a space where the candidate is comfortable asking questions and working through his own challenges in life with the guidance of his mentor. If done properly, a candidate should be inspired and enthusiastic to return to lodge with renewed vigor each week and with a clear understand of why he decided to become a Mason!

3) Review proficiency work, then leave with a question. During a typical mentoring session, I start by working through a few lines of memorization in the proficiency, then discussing with the candidate some ideas for applying those ideas and symbolisms to his daily life. At the end of our meeting, I leave the candidate with a philosophical question to ponder, which he is required to consider throughout the week and to which he should jot down his answers in a pocket notebook. The next time we meet, we work through that question and continue on. This form of mentorship through questioning is effective because rather than teaching the candidate knowledge, the mentor inspires the candidate to come up with his own answers. Only then does he effectively internalize the Masonic symbols and lessons.

These three principles of mentorship are what we follow at Honolulu Lodge, and the result of our active and youthful membership speaks for itself! Proper mentorship and inspiration takes a lot of effort, but that effort will be paid off through better retention and growth in your lodge. In the words of an anonymous poet:

You came with me on a long arduous journey,

Through many forests and jungles;

The paths confusing and twisted,

Sometimes, I made you miss a turning;

There was no promised pot of gold.

But then my brethren, it is not the gold;

It was the search itself;

The journey and your comradeship,

The jungles we saw

The forests we conquered

The rivers we forded,

And the links we made.

It would not have happened

If it was not for the pot of gold.

The light that we seek is not a destination, but an ongoing process. The journey itself is the pot of gold. At the end of this journey, we find peace of mind – the contentment and fulfillment that comes with becoming not just a Master Mason, but also a Master of ourselves and our understanding of the world in which we live. The philosophies inculcated by Masonry then come naturally to us with little effort, and the joy that results from this peace of mind is something that nobody can take away, because it is grounded on personal experience and practice.

“Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home.” ~ Matsuo Basho

So as we continue this wonderful Masonic retreat, I charge every brother here in this room to think about how you can best inspire your fellow brothers, especially your lodge candidates. The planning, logistics, finances, and everything else is important, but all of those things become FAR easier when you have a strong membership base that is grounded on personal inspiration. As a lodge leader, you will know that you have succeeded when you no longer have to push your brothers to do something and instead, you feel that you are all walking the same journey together.

I would like to end with my absolute favorite Masonic poem of all time, one that I’ve printed out and keep handy whenever I myself need inspiration to move forward in Masonic leadership no matter how rough and rugged the road ahead may be. These were the words of Brother Joseph Fort Newton in his book, “The Builders,” published in 1914:

When is a Man a Mason?

“When he can look out over the rivers, the hills, and the far horizon with a profound sense of his own littleness in the vast scheme of things, and yet have faith, hope, and courage – which is the root of every virtue. When he knows that down in his heart every man is as noble, as vile, as divine, as diabolic, and as lonely as himself, and seeks to know, to forgive, and to love his fellow man. When he knows how to sympathize with men in their sorrows, yea, even in their sins – knowing that each man fights a hard fight against many odds. When he has learned how to make friends and to keep them, and above all how to keep friends with himself. When he loves flowers, can hunt birds without a gun, and feels the thrill of an old forgotten joy when he hears the laugh of a little child. When he can be happy and high-minded amid the meaner drudgeries of life. When star-crowned trees, and the glint of sunlight on flowing waters, subdue him like the thought of one much loved and long dead. When no voice of distress reaches his ears in vain, and no hand seeks his aid without response. When he finds good in every faith that helps any man to lay hold of divine things and sees majestic meanings in life, whatever the name of that faith may be. When he can look into a wayside puddle and see something beyond mud, and into the face of the most forlorn fellow mortal and see something beyond sin. When he knows how to pray, how to love, how to hope. When he has kept faith with himself, with his fellow man, and with his God; in his hand a sword for evil, in his heart a bit of a song – glad to live, but not afraid to die! Such a man has found the only real secret of Masonry, and the one which it is trying to give to all the world.”

Thank you for the opportunity to share and fellowship with you all. May your Masonic journeys continue to be the most rewarding, and I wish you fair winds and following seas! If you ever find yourself in Hawaii, please do come visit Honolulu Lodge on Tuesday nights!

Thank you.

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