• If you took the PILM exam in July or early August, please contact ctdcompton@aol.com with your contact info.

Grand Lodge Messenger – Grand Master’s Special Edition (4th Quarter)

YOU HAVE A JOB TO DO

Our Annual Communication is just around the corner. This will be your opportunity to exercise your responsibility to set the future direction of our Craft. 

We have three Resolutions that have been carried over from last year’s Annual Communication. Lodges have put forth seven Resolutions for your consideration, two of which have been deemed out of order. In addition, I am making six recommendations.

Grand Master’s Recommendation No. 1 (2017-8): To eliminate the usage of the Masonic Retirement Center auditorium for any purpose.

As the facility is presently on the market for sale, this precludes the availability of the auditorium.

Grand Master’s Recommendation No. 2 (2017-9): To permit the use of video recording during a Grand Lodge Trial.

Video recording would result in instant availability of the record of trial proceedings and would be a valuable tool, in conjunction with the written transcripts and audio records, to permit rapid response to appeals.

Grand Master’s Recommendation No. 3 (2017-10): To clarify the Grand Lodge Trial Committee’s duties and to eliminate a conflict regarding who imposes the penalty after a verdict of guilty in a Masonic Trial.

It needs to be clear that the job of the Trial Committee is to investigate, consider, conduct, report, and make a recommendation to the Grand Master. It is then the Grand Master’s duty to take the appropriate action.

Grand Master’s Recommendation No. 4 (2017-11): To redefine the name and purpose of the Military Recognition Committee.

The general idea behind this Resolution is to shift this committee from one that doles out plaques to one that works with Washington Masonic Charities to provide assistance and support to our veterans. I think it was best put by VW Jim Tourtillotte: We need to make sure that we don’t forget the kid who went to Iraq, came back messed up, and disappeared to the family farm in Washtucna never to be seen again.

Grand Master’s Recommendation No. 5 (2017-12): To bring uniformity in the Cornerstone Ceremony.

When the Alternate Cornerstone Ceremony was developed, the part of the Master Architect was eliminated. I believe that this part is vital to the ceremony, and should be reintroduced.

Grand Master’s Recommendation No. 6 (2017-13): To provide the Grand Master the option of appointing a Deputy of the Grand Master for a third consecutive term.

When I joined the Fraternity some 20 years ago, there were more than 30,000 members. Today, there are around 12,000. Over the years it has become increasingly difficult to find Brethren willing and able to serve as Deputy of the Grand Master. The demands of this job have become numerous and extremely weighty, and we must not get into the habit of appointing a man just because it is “his turn”. This recommendation will allow present Deputies the ability to identify and train those Brethren who are not quite ready, but may benefit from a year of training vs. being thrown into the fray. Several Jurisdictions already place no term limit on the position of Deputy (or its equivalent). This resolution is about giving our Grand Lodge the ability to develop future leaders.

Ask questions. Listen carefully to the answers. Look well to your ballot, and vote for the good of Masonry.

 

CAN YOU WIN THE GAME IN THE 4TH QUARTER? 

It may be human nature to ease up as one approaches the end of a journey, but the old track athlete in me needs to just plow forward, lower my head, and push my hardest through the finish line. I was coached to run through the tape, so I have and so I shall.

One of the great highlights of this 4th Quarter was being received as Grand Master at the recent DeMolay Conclave. It was an overwhelming and emotional experience. As I stood at the altar being presented and introduced to the young men of DeMolay and their advisors, I found myself flooded with memories of my time as a DeMolay.

I remembered falling in love with the idea of being part of an organization that had a goal of making me a better son, a better brother, a better friend. I recalled with great fondness the camaraderie that DeMolay offered. I harkened back to the ritualistic ceremonies and the lessons they imparted. I married a Job’s Daughter, consider a Rainbow Girl to be my oldest and dearest friend, and am a charter initiate of a Masonic Lodge named after the founder of DeMolay. The Masonic Youth experience in many ways defines who I am.

This is why the “One More” initiative was introduced. Each of us has a responsibility to “Be the Difference” in the lives of our Masonic Youth. It is well to remember that our youth may someday be the future leaders of not only our Fraternity but potentially of our corporate or government sectors. We owe it to them and ourselves to provide the mentorship and guiding example that will allow them to reach their fullest potential so that they can Be the Difference in their little corner of the world. Just ask MW Carl Smith if it was worth his time to be a DeMolay advisor.

Every Grand Master will tell you that he looks forward to his District’s Meeting during his term of office. The Brethren are particularly excited to welcome one of their own, and the Grand Master is filled with the entire gamut of emotions. Such was the case at the District No. 13 Meeting.

At the District No. 13 Meeting I found myself in the presence of one of my DeMolay advisors, the Past Grand Master who signed my high school diploma and gave me the gift of Masonic curiosity, the founding father of my home Lodge, and the Past Grand Master who has always been there with guidance & counsel. I am proud to call District No. 13 home. We may be loud, but that’s how we proudly roll.

I had occasion to speak with the folks at Puget Sound Honor Flight to see if they might carve out some time at an upcoming arrival so that I might present another check from the sale of my lapel pins. They were very accommodating, but little did I know that I was being set up.

To be sure, a check presentation was made, but only after they presented our Grand Lodge with a plaque recognizing not only our contributions of money but also of our time. Over this year, I have asked for your money, but I have also asked for your time. I’ve asked you to attend the flight departures and flight arrivals. You have done so, and have hopefully felt the same life-affirming experience that I have. I’ve heard it said that our support of the Honor Flight program has been one of the best things our Grand Lodge has done. I am hard pressed to disagree.

While I’m on the subject of doing great things, I have a question. Have you ever wondered what motivates your Brethren? How about an invitation to change their little corner world, to “Be the Difference”. When you give your Brethren the opportunity to “Be the Difference”, their lives and membership in the Fraternity take on deeper meaning and significance.

For the past few years, the Brethren of District No. 19 have been a primary sponsor of the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Great Strides Event. The inspiration behind their sponsorship is Levi Johnson, son of our Grand Standard Bearer WB Gordon Johnson. Levi has struggled and lived with CF, and is a shining example of what happens when one does not let the disease define who they are.

The Brethren of District No. 19 proudly call themselves “Levi’s Uncles”. They host a charity dinner in support of the fight against CF and are the number one fundraising team at the annual Great Strides Event – not to mention that they grill up some tasty hot dogs for the run/walk participants. To the Brethren of District No. 19, CF is not just another charity. It is more of a noble cause, a rallying point that brings them together to improve their little corner of the world – to “Be the Difference”.

In 1980, the Brethren of Thornton F. McElroy Lodge, No. 302 thought enough of my scholarship and community service to award me one of their scholarships. My tenure as an elected Grand Lodge officer has granted me the opportunity to attend several presentations to deserving students throughout our Jurisdiction.

At one such presentation, as part of the application process the students were presented with this query: Name a Mason who has inspired or influenced you. There were predictable responses like George Washington and Ben Franklin, as well as outside the box responses like Joseph Smith and Prince Hall. There was also an unexpected response of Jim Mendoza. The young student who put forth my name got a hold of my biography and stated that she was impressed with my efforts in the fight against breast cancer and with my support of the Honor Flight Network.

As I listened to this young lady, I found myself thinking “folks are paying attention”. Brethren, it is well to remember that when we hold ourselves out as Masons that brings with it Great Expectations to Walk the Talk Every Day in Every Way. I get it. It’s not easy. You stumble along the way, but you persevere. Maybe that’s why we often refer to Freemasonry as work.

Freemasonry is an incredible smorgasbord, filled with numerous avenues of finding the light which we all seek. It has been a great delight to be part of the events hosted by our Concordant and Appendant bodies. Each event was memorable and left a lasting impression upon my heart. One such event was the Reception of the Grand Master hosted by the Seattle Valley of the Scottish Rite.

The Sovereign Grand Inspector General (SGIG) of the Orient of Washington is Ill. and Most Worshipful Brother Al Jorgensen. The Personal Representative of the SGIG in Valley of Seattle is Ill. and Most Worshipful Sat Tashiro. As I sat between these distinguished Brothers, I couldn’t help but think that in many ways they got me started on this journey. I served as Deputy of the Grand Master in District No. 13 under both of these Past Grand Masters. MW Sat has a personal story that inspires one and all to higher thoughts, nobler deeds, and greater achievements. As MW Al was himself a Deputy of the Grand Master in District No. 13 as well as a member of my home Lodge, the idea of holding one’s self to “Great Expectations” takes on a whole new meaning. Most Worshipful Sirs, it is an honor to share in your legacy.

FINAL THOUGHTS

It all started when I was accepted into membership in Frank S Land Lodge, No. 313. To the Brethren of my home Lodge – especially WB Drew Baker and VW Jeffery Brunson – THANK YOU. WB Drew, your vision of creating a Lodge that spoke directly to the younger Mason remains extraordinary. I am so glad to see you going through the line one more time, and it will be my privilege to be in your service. VW Jeff, as the first Worshipful Master of our Lodge you bore the brunt of some unfair criticism from those who may not have understood what we were trying to do, but remained steadfast in your belief that the Masonic experience we were trying to create was the right experience for our membership. I have appreciated your guidance and counsel over the years – particularly these most recent ones. I cherish our friendship, and I am at your call whenever you need me. Drew and Jeff, there is no doubt in my mind that I would not be a Mason today, let alone serve in this office, if it were not for the two of you.

As I close this final Grand Master’s Communicator, I share these words from WB George Washington:

“In reviewing the incidents of my administration, I am unconscious of intentional error, I am nevertheless too sensible of my defects not to think it probable that I may have committed many errors. Whatever they may be, I fervently beseech the Almighty to avert or mitigate the evils to which they may tend. I shall also carry with me the hope, that you, My Brethren, will never cease to view them with indulgence; and that, after these years of my life dedicated to your service with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent abilities will be consigned to oblivion.”

As the clock winds down on this 4th Quarter I have been often asked how I wish to be remembered. That is a question of legacy. My Brothers, it is well to remember legacy is about planting seeds that you may never see produce fruit; it is about writing songs that may be sung by someone else; it is about plans that may take a different direction that what was originally envisioned. Whatever manner I am remembered, as I stated at the beginning, I hope that my time as your Grand Master has inspired you to nobler deeds, to higher thoughts, and greater achievements that allowed you the opportunity to “Be the Difference”.

Grand Lodge Messenger – Grand Master’s Special Edition (3rd Quarter)

IT COMES TO SEATTLE

 Since 1780, Grand Masters from throughout North America have gathered together “to know each other and to learn how others are meeting and handling the problems of the Fraternity in their Jurisdictions.”

The Conference is attended by the Grand Master, Grand Secretary and stationed Grand Line officers of the member Grand Lodges, sister Jurisdictions and associate members, as well as heads of concordant bodies and Masonic organizations, and interested observers from many other affiliated groups.

Currently, the Conference membership consists of the Grand Lodges of the Provinces of Canada; the States of the United States of America, including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico; the State of York, Mexico; and the American-Canadian Grand Lodge of Germany.  These Grand Masters represent some two million Freemasons in North America.

From the very beginning, it was clearly understood that these conferences are a voluntary assembly of Masons, meeting informally, and expressing their individual views on the subjects discussed. No definite action can be taken by such a conference which would in any way commit or bind any participating Grand Lodge. Each conference is a distinct and separate assembly; it has no permanent existence of authority. Its deliberations are never an official declaration of Masonic jurisprudence or philosophy. Each conference expires on its adjournment, except for the machinery it sets up for the next meeting or a voluntary association of Grand Masters to meet, to confer, and to learn from one another.

“What we have long needed, and in recent years have been developing, is a unity of purpose and action growing out of these annual conferences. We have learned that we can do more effective work in our own Jurisdictions if we are in a position to act in the light of as complete knowledge as possible of the aims and experiences of our Brethren from Maine to California.” (Willis J. Bray, GM 1946, Missouri) Knowledge is still one of the chief goals of the Grand Masters Conference.

Beyond the “think tank” atmosphere, the Conference is a venue for sharing of ideas. The Associations/Committees of the Conference include the Child Identification Program (CHIP), Commission on Information for Recognition, George Washington National Masonic Memorial Association, Masonic Renewal Committee, Masonic Service Association of North America, and the National Masonic Foundation for Children. The Conference has been the genesis of several programs that have made their way to our Jurisdiction: Long Range Planning, Bikes for Books, Six Steps to Initiation, and the Masonic Model Student Assistance Program come to mind. Additionally, ideas such as the Lodge Leadership Retreat, Outreach Services, and a photography archive have made their way from our Jurisdiction.

Formerly held strictly in Washington DC, the Conference has worked its way throughout the United States and Canada. At the recently completed Conference in Omaha, it was announced that the 2021 Conference will be held in Seattle. This will be an exciting opportunity for us to show how we practice Freemasonry in Washington. Over the coming years, in my capacity as event chairman, I will be asking Brethren to volunteer to be part of the organizing committee. There will be lots of things to do in the areas of greeting, transportation, hospitality, and concierge services – and that’s just for openers.
As a bonus for volunteering, throughout the Conference, you will have the opportunity to interact with and learn from Masonic leaders throughout the world of Freemasonry. Stay tuned as more information becomes available. I hope that you are as excited to welcome the Brethren to our great state.

__________________________________

THE POWER OF WORDS

Former Seattle Mariners third base coach Rich Donnelly had a nearly 50-year career in the big leagues. Perhaps the best-known story of Donnelly is his experience coaching the Florida Marlins in the 1997 World Series. His 17-year-old daughter, Amy, died of a brain tumor in 1993. Amy attended a 1992 playoff game in which Rich was coaching. She noticed that he would cup his hands over his mouth while yelling out instructions to runners on second base. After the game, she asked, “Dad, what are you telling them? That the chicken runs at midnight, or what?” Since her death, the Donnelly family would deem that as her catchphrase and serve inspiration for the family.

In 1997, as a member of the Florida Marlins, he met Craig Counsell, a player his son, Tim, nicknamed “Chicken” because of his unique batting stance. In the 11th inning of Game 7, Counsell reached base and was able to advance to third base as the inning progressed. Edgar Rentería then hit a single on which Counsell scored, winning the World Series for the Marlins. Rich’s sons Tim and Mike, who were honorary bat boys that evening, rushed to their father in celebration. Tim pointed out to the stadium clock which read 12:00 midnight, telling his father, “The Chicken ran at midnight, dad.”

As I was contemplating the deeper meaning of “the chicken runs at midnight”, I was reminded of the power of words. “Words are singularly the most powerful force available to humanity. We can choose to use this force constructively with words of encouragement, or destructively using words of despair. Words have energy and power with the ability to help, to heal, to hinder, to hurt, to harm, to humiliate and to humble.” (Yehuda Berg)

As an active participant in social media, I hope that my posts are encouraging, enlightening, and uplifting. I wish to use words for their greatest good, to help and to heal. Sadly, I am finding that men who hold themselves out as Masons are choosing to use words to hinder, to hurt, to harm, to humiliate, and to humble. For example, I recently read a post where a Brother stated that he “had some fun trolling some ‘snowflakes’ this past weekend…” I am forced to wonder, how is choosing to be an Internet troll showing Freemasonry in its best light? Another stated that he simply posted what he saw from other sites, and if he later discovered that it was wrong he simply deleted it. My thoughts here are directed to the lesson of logic as put forth in our Middle Chamber Lecture. Remember stuff on social media never goes away, even if you delete it.

As Masons, we must be forefront in the practice of the teachings of our ritual – to borrow a phrase from a Past Grand Master, everyday in every way. This is particularly important when one considers that any post made on social media extends well beyond your friends list. When we engage in social media, it is well to remember the importance of circumspection – especially in the presence of the uninitiated who read your Facebook page or Twitter feed.

Freemasonry is a wonderful Fraternity. We are all Brothers, even when we may not always agree on all issues – we are still Brothers.

_____________________________

FREEMASONRY’S DAY ON THE HILL

This state’s first duly elected Governor was Most Worshipful Brother Elisha P. Ferry. This state’s first duly elected Secretary of State was Most Worshipful Brother Thomas M. Reed. One of the original authors of the Revised Code of Washington was Most Worshipful Brother Archibald P. Frater. Notice a theme?

The Grand Lodge of Washington was formed in 1858 – more than 30 years before the Washington territory achieved statehood. The legislature first met in the halls of Olympia Lodge, No. 1. In many ways, Freemasonry gave this state a sense of direction with respect to governance. Then, for whatever reason, we walked away. It is well past time that we return.

Thanks to the vision of Most Worshipful Brother Sam Roberts, a Legislative Liaison in the person of VW Clayton LaVigne was appointed to reintroduce Freemasonry to the Legislature. Along the way, VW Clayton has been instrumental in restoring signs at rest stops informing weary travelers that coffee was available; arranged for an audience with the Department of Revenue to open a dialogue to allow the elected line to discuss the importance of tax abatement for our Lodge buildings; and brought to our attention the opportunity to support and fund the Legislative Page Scholarship Program.

In a continuing effort to Reclaim the Narrative, we will be holding our first (and hopefully annual) Freemasonry’s Day on the Hill. The idea is for Brethren to set up appointments with their legislators to lend a hand to VW Clayton in reintroducing Freemasonry to the legislature by presenting issues that are important to the Fraternity. For this initial effort, we will present the importance of civility in dialogue, express our support of the Legislative Page Scholarship Program, and talk about the work of Washington Masonic Charities.

Freemasonry’s Day on the Hill will be held on Monday, March 20th. We will start with a meeting at noon in the House Rules Room (Room 123 on the 1st floor of the Legislative Building). Following this meeting, you will meet with your legislators to talk about our issues. You will need to contact your legislators in advance of the 20th to set up your meetings. Let them know that you will be in Olympia for Freemasonry’s Day On The Hill, and would appreciate having an opportunity to meet. The plan is for us to be there from 1:00 – 4:00, so be sure to request an appointment sometime in that timeframe. You should expect about a 10 – 15 minute time slot, so it is important that you have the talking points down – hence the group meeting at noon. You can contact your legislators at http://app.leg.wa.gov/DistrictFinder/.

Hope to see many of you for our Day on the Hill.

A Christmas Message from the Grand Master

For me, the Christmas season really begins when I hear Andy Williams singing “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year“. There are two key reasons why I feel this way: One, the Andy Williams Christmas specials were an important part of my childhood. Two, it truly is the most wonderful time of the year.

Masonically speaking, it is the height of the installation season. This is our opportunity as brethren to give thanks to the outgoing Master for all of his hard work, to give best wishes to his successor, and to pledge the support of the Brethren to the new ‘team’. I recall my installation as Master of Frank S. Land Lodge No. 313 as a joyous occasion. The energy in the room was electric. I could feel that no one wanted me to fail. No doubt, others who have made the journey to East feel the same way. What’s not wonderful about that?

This is also a time of religious and moral reflection that inspire many people to reach out to those who are in need. Though Freemasonry is not a charity in the truest sense of the word, charity is an inseparable part of Freemasonry. It is my belief that you cannot be a Freemason if you are not charitable. Being charitable is one way that you can Be the Difference and add to the wonder of the season.

Most importantly, it is a time when those of us of faith – whatever that faith may be – celebrate then the traditions of our faith. For me and my family, that celebration is Christmas. The story of the birth of Christ as related in the Book of Luke, Chapter 2, (most eloquently recited by Linus Van Pelt) is what makes this time of year most wonderful.

I also enjoy the secular traditions of the season – shopping, decorating the house, looking at neighborhood light displays, holiday specials, preparing the meal, and the look of joy on a loved one’s face when a present is opened. Lest I forget, I still visit Santa and get my picture taken.

As I wrap up my Christmas message, I share these words from “Santa Claus is Coming to Town”:

How can they talk about Santa Claus when there is so much unhappiness in the world? Poor, misguided folks. They missed the whole point. Lot’s of unhappiness? Maybe so. But doesn’t Santa take a little bit of that unhappiness away? Doesn’t a smile on Christmas morning scratch out a tear cried on a sadder day? Not much maybe. But what would happen if we all tried to be like Santa and learned to give as only he can give: of ourselves, our talents, our love and our hearts? Maybe we could all learn Santa’s beautiful lesson and maybe there would finally be peace on Earth and good will toward men.

A Very Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, and the Best of the Holiday Season to one and all – God Bless Us, Everyone!

Details for Upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight

Here are the details for the departure and arrival for the upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight.

 

Departure from SeaTac: 9/24, Alaska 718, 8:15AM

For the sendoff, please be at upper level of the airport terminal, Door #25/Alaska Airlines area, located near Skybridge #4. Our heroes have been asked to arrive no later than 6:00AM.

 

Arrival at SeaTac 9/26 – Alaska 761, 8:15PM

The Welcome Celebration will be held on Monday the 26th in the Atrium of SeaTac Airport (located on the baggage claim level, south most end of the airport). Families are expected to start filling up the area around 7:00PM. Signs & balloons are highly encouraged.

 

Time to rally the troops! Let’s be there to send them off and to welcome them home!

*In addition, we will be hosting a small reception at the Grand Lodge Office on the 20th of September at noon to present the collected donations and thank you cards made by Job’s daughters International and International Order of Rainbow for girls Washington and Idaho.

A Speech on Unity, From WB Natural Allah

First and foremost, as the Worshipful Master of, and on behalf of Steilacoom Lodge #2, I’d like to thank all of you for being here today. This is a historic moment, a moment that we will share together for all of eternity. Many have asked the question: “If you are all Masons, why do you need a Unity March? Why do you need this dialogue amongst yourselves?” The answer is simple…with all of the atrocities that we see happening in our current world and various machinations devising plans to divide and separate among gender, class, political affiliation and skin color, in the midst of my Brothers…I am home. Home is a place where we can discard the masks we oftentimes find ourselves wearing; where we can be free to express ourselves without judgment or the feeling of inferiority; where our views and opinions are no more or less valid than anyone else’s and a place where we can genuinely laugh and feel safe.

Twenty five years ago our Brothers recognized the value of Unity when they set out to create what we have right now. More importantly they saw the value in each and every one of us and laid the foundation upon which we should then build our moral and Masonic edifices, together. Just as the Church is an assemblage of believers in Christ, so too is the Masonic Lodge for it too is an assemblage of Free and Accepted Masons duly congregated. But I dare say that the Church and the Lodge are so much more. They have become our safety nets, our lifelines, our places of refuge, the incubators of revolutionary thought and ideas. And although time may ravage both the walls of the Church and the Lodge, we must come into the realization that we have not only an obligation to one another, but those outside the Church and outside the Lodge because these generous principles extend further in that every human being has a claim upon your kind office.

We all stand as a shining example of what and who we can become when we work together. But I charge each and every one of you to beware of complacency and comfortability for they are the enemies of change and Unity. We have created dialogue, we have created an exchange of information and have broken bread together…But always remember to continually ask yourselves: What more can I do to solidify our Unity? Because in the next 25 years the faces in the pews may change, so what will be said about us and the foundation that we are laying here today? I long for the day that we as Masons can be members of any Lodge of our choosing; where we can sit in any Lodge at any time among any of our Brethren and feel the way I feel at this very moment…at home. I urge you all to cultivate our Unity; to allow it to permeate the very fabric of your daily lives and to make it a part of your Masonic and Spiritual journey, for in doing so, our lives and the Craft will be an ever mindful example of the sacrifices that have been made for us and because of us and invariably allowing us to… “Be the Difference!”

 

WB Natural Allah

Shine the Spotlight on Those Who Deserve It

Recently the cast of “Hamilton” paid tribute to the landmark musical “A Chorus Line” on the occasion of its 40th anniversary on Broadway. Part of the tribute included the cast of “Hamilton” performing the signature number from “A Chorus Line”, “What I Did for Love”. As various cast members took their turn at a solo section, I was struck by the fact that none of the principals claimed a solo part, https://youtu.be/h-BB_2L2Dwg. This speaks directly to the spirit of “A Chorus Line” – take the spotlight off the star and shine it upon those who make the show work.

In many ways, your leadership is borrowing this idea from “A Chorus Line”. I think General Colin Powell said it best: “Though important, we will accomplish nothing strictly by organizational chart, strategic plan, or management theory. We will succeed or fail because of the people involved.” So let’s set the future of our Craft by those who make up the Craft, who are our Craft, who are the strength that sustain our Craft, who are our Craft’s future.

At installation, I laid out eight key initiatives: Improve Membership Retention, Increase Use & Awareness of the New Candidate Education Program, Continue to Develop Future Leaders, Leverage Technology to Improve the Quality of the Lodge Experience, “One More”, Reclaim the Narrative, Review the Long Plan, Reshape the Military Recognition Committee. Each of these initiatives is being undertaken by a key committee, and I am proud to report that each of them have developed plans of action – complete with timelines, deliverables, and measurables – to see to the accomplishment of their objectives. In some cases, objectives have already been achieved, and I am looking forward to each committee sharing with you how they are doing.

As I stated in my remarks at installation, any success that is achieved will belong to those who make up these key committees, and they will deserve the accolades and applause. Any shortcoming will be on me for not providing the appropriate guidance, direction, or resources. The Grand Master may be the “star”, but it is the brethren who make it work and who deserve the spotlight.

Featured photo source: YouTube

Oration: The Tragedy of the Character of Hiram Abiff.

MGM – Manlalakbay na Gurong Mason (Traveling Master Mason)

Masonic Family Park

Granite Falls, Wa.

July 2, 2016

Oration:

The Tragedy of the Character of Hiram Abiff.

There is a modicum of uncertainty among less-informed brethren as to whether the tragedy of Hiram Abiff really existed. For every lodge has their own interpretation that calls for some brothers to think that it has become something different from its origin. So animated and so confrontational that it no longer suits the insulated sameness that it is to be… a mock tragedy.

A brother, who showed his shallowness of reason by neglecting the importance of the drama makes him unfit to ever become a member of the craft.

To understand and appreciate the drama to its fullest extent and to absorb the essence of its profound meaning is something that will be with us for quite sometime.

Though it is wrong to consider it as history, the image of the drama always comes across with purity and sacred ritualistic quality.

The catastrophe of our very self is evidently portrayed, regardless of who we are or where we are. It is the reflection of the crisis & fate of that Hiram Abiff in every one of us.

The work he engaged in to beautify and adorn the temple is similar to the cunning workmanship we do as we try to manage and adorn our own daily lives – our own temple so to speak.

The ruffians he encountered symbolize none other than the lusts and passions we men fail to subdue.

And his final destiny to be buried in the rubbish of the temple is an allegorical picture of our great mental distress, a tragic loss of a son, disgrace, or the defeat of our hopes and dreams; this is a common experience in our daily lives.

The manner in which he was raised again is the same manner by which men, with God’s mighty help, will raise us out of the receptacles of defeat, disgrace or even death.

We were asked to take part in the drama this afternoon not only to satisfy the ritual of the SUBLIME DEGREE but to impress deeply upon the mind that it is our drama not our newly raised brother, there being exemplified or being inflicted with pain.

Our participation was intended to be an experience to let us realize that to become a master of our very self we must rise above our own internal enemies.

After all, as they say: “the strongest among us are the ones who smile through silent pain, cry behind closed doors and fight battles nobody knows about.”

Finally, though the path to fulfilling happiness may seem elusive to some of us, with the trials and the inevitable sufferings in life, it is still a great day indeed to be a Mason.

Featured photo source: Wikipedia Commons.

2014 Grand Master's Message

Bruce

Most Worshipful
Bruce E. Vesper
Grand Master

 

As Masons, we are first and foremost builders.  Where once masons built cathedrals and structures of stone, today’s Masons must build structures that connect with others.  We must connect with our families, with our communities, and with our fraternity.  It is not enough to say that we have built something in the past; we must continue to build today and tomorrow.  Our work will never be done.

We must always strive to put the good of the fraternity first.  We must strive to be better Masons than those who have gone before us.  It is a lifelong challenge to which every one of us must dedicate themselves.

Be a Masonic Builder, and build a bridge to others!