• If you took the PILM exam in July or early August, please contact ctdcompton@aol.com with your contact info.

Sam Roberts – Q&A

Speaker 1: Thank you Most Worshiful Brother Sam Roberts. Thanks for joining me.

Sam: Good morning.

Speaker 1: I have got a couple of questions for you. First one, why did you become a Mason?

Sam: Because of my grandfather. That’s a partial explanation, but my grandfather was a remarkable man who did not let lack of education, nor lack of social standing keep him from being one of the most respected men in his community. The question, the kind of base question of, “Was he a good man because he was a Mason, or because he was a Mason did he become a good man?” That I don’t have an answer to and I don’t know if it really matters.

Speaker 1: Why did you remain active in the fraternity?

Sam: For a number of reasons. One, I am committed to making the world a better place. So are most of the Masons that I know. By doing so and joining other people, other like minded people, I think we can give back. Sometimes that mountain is a little bit steep but it’s worth the climb.

Speaker 1: In your own words, what is the purpose of our fraternity?

Sam: To show the world that there is a way to live that brings happiness to you and others. How is that for a statement? I just made that up. I like it. I may use that again.

Speaker 1: I know that in the past one of our slogans (for lack of a better definition) has been Freemasons help make good men better. If there was a thing you felt that Masonry could help Sam Roberts improve, what would that be and how would it matter in your life? In other words, what else can the fraternity do going forward to help accomplish it’s purpose specific to you?

Sam: That’s an interesting question that is going to require some thought. The answer I believe is going to be … If we examine our history, we will find that Masonry a number of years ago was a fraternity of men but it involved not only our families but also their communities. We were well respected, well regarded, and appreciated.

Somewhere along the line over the last 50 or 60 years, we have gotten more interested in numbers than we have in benefits, if you will. I would like to see us maybe become smaller but a lot more active with our families, with our communities, with the projects, and see if we can’t recoup some of the things that we have lost. By doing so, it is my belief that Masonry will be more effective toward what I think we should be doing and that’s just making sure the world is a nicer, happier place on a daily basis. In other words… can I just coin a phrase? Freemasonry, everyday, everyday.

Speaker 1: In many ways, you just answered my next question, which was how has Free Masonry mission changed and how do you see it evolving, so I’m going to go to the next question. I find it to be very convoluted, but I don’t think you’ll have any problems, especially not the direction. How can Sam Roberts help a prospective member whose sole familiarity with our fraternity may be that his grandfather or his uncle was a Mason to recognize that the fraternity is just as relevant and just as important to him today as it was to his ancestors?

Sam: The question is a little bit convoluted and the answer is going to be multi-part. The first thing is by living the example of what Masonry should be, we should know the world… we show the world what masonry can be. Secondly, you make yourself available to the prospect as well as the new members as a mentor, a coach, a friend and a brother and all the rest of the things that we stand for. Lastly – actually probably most importantly – is making sure that they know you are available for all the things that we stand for. If you are in need or in want of further education, if you are in want of light, we are there for that. When that call comes we are Johnny on the spot.

Now was that a convoluted answer? It was.

Speaker 1: I know. I’m sorry it took us so long to hook up together but I greatly appreciate your time on this project.

Sam: Absolutely. No problem whatsoever.

You may also like

One comment

  • William Wallace July 12, 2016   Reply →

    MW Sam you’ve made a very interesting right up and I have to commend you, it was a pleasure to read.

Leave a comment