WA Freemasons Night @ Husky Stadium

The Washington Freemasons are coming to Husky Stadium this fall to watch the Huskies play Arizona State in our Pac-12 Regular Season Finale.

Special Group Pricing & Seating

$40.00 (almost $30 off of the face value of the ticket)
Everyone ordering by the deadline of Monday, November 7th will enjoy group seating together at the game.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ORDER FORM and additional information.

GO DAWGS!

 

What Freemasons Can Learn from The Pope

I’m what the old guys would call “a tech guy.” What that means to me and what it means to them are two very different things. To them, it means I know how to do something as far as this whole ‘internet thing’ is concerned. While I may get tripped up on the technicalities of specialization of my profession, they’re right about one thing, I’m a millennial through and through.

There’s been a lot of confusion about the word ‘millennial’. I subscribe to a field of thought that views millennials as the post-generation generation. Unlike Generation Y, which is who most people confuse with Millennials, Millennials act in a new way of being human that relies primarily on digital technology as our most natural way to connect with others. That means that it includes any age group, nationality, or culture of human who live and breathe in the digital world as much as they do in the physical.

Millennials, because of our use of technology to connect with others, naturally see the world through a lense that is much broader than people who grew up without a real-time window into the lives of others. Freemasonry across the world has understood that we have “a marketing problem”, however, what many freemasons don’t realize is that you can’t solve it with a new logo or a tagline. We have to adopt new technology in order to speak the new language millennials understand: social media.

For those who don’t really understand why so many social networks exist, the explanation is actually fairly simple. Each social network has its own purpose. Linkedin is ideally used for work connections, Pinterest is used to collect beautiful and inspirational images, Facebook is the place to keep up with friends and acquaintances, Twitter is optimal for connecting with strangers to discuss mutual interests and topics, and Instagram is where we share memories visually. All of these networks help enhance our human experience by connecting with many many more people than we otherwise could.

Jason Silva is someone who I would consider to be an archetype of a 21st century philosopher. This video is a little piece he did that explains the network.

Now comes the interesting phenomenon: following celebrities. People follow them because they want to feel like a part of their life and enjoy in the moments that they feel are special to them. And the oldest celebrity office in the world, the Pope himself, finally joined instagram in March of this year. Frankly, he’s killing it.

Millennials crave authenticity and transparency. These are things that become more and more difficult for institutions as they age, so the Freemasons and the Catholic church face a similar challenge in that regard. However, when an old institution like the Vatican focuses their Instagram account on the humanity of those precious passing moments of the present, old institutions become very relevant.

So my call to action is, every lodge should have someone instagramming, whether they do it personally and include the fact that they are a Freemason in their bio, or by posting on behalf on of their lodge. The focus should be on the fellowship, not the regalia. The secrets of our brotherhood are the bonds between brothers, and everyone can relate to or aspire to that.

What Came You Here to Do?

By VW Zane P. McCune, DDGM 13

picGood Evening Brethren, welcome to autumn in the Pacific Northwest. This is actually my favorite time of year. The rainy days upon us have quickly greened up our summer lawns and the sunny-crisp days of September are the last glimmers of summer fading away. We are reminded that the chill of winter will be knocking on our door shortly, and with it comes the shadowed silhouette of leaf-bare branches.

Our year is beginning to draw to an end. For many, this time is reminiscent of the sands in the hour glass noticeably and yet quickly diminishing and as a result we begin to naturally look inward and examine what this year has meant. And this has given me cause to reflect on our Grand Master’s message this year.

Before becoming a Freemason, this fraternity, this society you have joined asks of you one question – simple, yet profound – what came you here to do?

I hope your answer is just as profound.

Because none of us needs to be a Freemason. And want I mean to say is that we all choose to be a Freemason. We choose this life because something in our nature is responding to a mysterious call. And as such, your Masonic journey is really like a mission. Your mission, should you choose to accept it is to learn to subdue your passion and improve yourself in Masonry.

Learning to subdue your passion. Which at first blush seems a bit counterproductive. Don’t we learn as a child to be passionate about what we do? For the initiate of our Masonic order, this is one of the first and most important points of Freemasonry and yet this is often vulnerable to misinterpretation, and consequently it merits some examination.

First, we must understand why we use the word passion. As it relates to our ritual, I believe we are talking about an affection of the mind. Oxford Dictionary refers to this type of passion as “Any kind of feeling by which the mind is powerfully affected or moved; a vehement, commanding, or overpowering emotion.”

Which is why we come here, to this temple of virtue, to learn to subdue our overpowering emotions. Because passion taken to an extreme overcomes our reason. And are we not instructed by the virtue of PRUDENCE which teaches us “to regulate our lives and actions agreeably to the dictates of reason, and it is that habit by which we wisely judge and prudentially determine all things relative to our present as well as to our future happiness. This virtue should be the peculiar characteristic of every Mason, not only for the government of his conduct while in the Lodge, but also when in the world.”

In other words, when you combine these concepts into one thought, we can say that “to learn to subdue my passions” means to through the virtuous teachings of Masonry one learns to bring commanding and overpowering emotions and desires into subjection and control. This is quite the contrary to the situation in which a man’s passions and emotions have control over his sense of logic and reason – a situation which Masonry seeks to remedy and which is often described through the all too well known cliché of making a good man better. In other words, it is not within the capability of our ego-driven self to keep passion in check. We must learn to do this.

How?

By improving oneself in Masonry. At first this seems like almost an obvious statement – for why else would one be here? It’s so vast it almost seems like the perfect “catch all” statement. But before we gloss over it and commence with scheduling the next feast and celebration, let us consider the nature of this declaration.

For it is a personal commitment. You joined to improve yourself.

Unfortunately, the Masonic experience for some is reminiscent of the fallacy of what has become a tag line for an entire generation – Here we are now, entertain us. But nothing could be more opposite from the truth. Freemasonry exists for YOU to discover her treasure and no one should expect it to be done for them. You come here to improve yourself in knowledge of Masonry. And it is through and from this expansion of knowledge that we begin to learn to conduct ourselves with peace and harmony with those around us.

First with our brethren, but then with the outer world. And consequently, we become a better, more improved version of earlier self.

As Masons, we are called to labor and be laborers. From the very first step in our Initiatic journey we are taught symbolically how to make use of every hour of every day by the 24-inch gauge.

We are taught to divide our time equally between our service to the Supreme Architect and our worthy brethren, to our society through our vocation and to the refreshment of ourselves which includes, presumably, our family.

This is why it is so hard for many of us to sit idle, wasting the hours away accomplishing little but the short lived thrills of passing amusement.

It’s simply not in our nature as Masons.

If you stop and think about it, we are constantly working on a temple – whether it’s our spiritual, temporal, or our personal temple.

We build – that is what we do, and there is no rest for the weary.

You see, this is why our Grand Masters theme this year encapsulates the very essence of what it means to be a Mason. It’s not simply a theme but rather a reminder of the declaration you made when you chose to become a Mason.

‘Be the Difference’ by its very nature is calling our craft from refreshment to labor

once again.

So brethren, I ask you again, what came you here to do?

And with that…Let us now set to work.

Freemasons… Ministers of Civility?

This is an election year, in case you didn’t notice! It seems to be all anyone is talking about, so I guess I will talk about it too! For must of us its harder and harder not to get caught up in the fervor of this election cycle in our ever increasingly media driven society. Whether its your television, computer, tablet or phone you are probably getting news alerts every few minutes to announce the newest political insult to one candidate or the other (in reality these insults are falling directly on our republic, more on that later). Members of both political extremes would have you believe the United State’s survival is hinged on a single issue, and if you don’t agree you are some kind of traitor. The only breaks seem to be when the news reports on celebrity scandals. Its no wonder ever one is on edge.

Its not news to say that fear is the best motivator of people. Our minds and bodies are wired in such a way that fear can easily override our rational mind and our compassionate heart. This makes sense from a survival point of view, when predators waited behind every tree to attack, but in the modern world it is sometimes misplaced, and can be used to manipulate us. It has long been known that base survival instincts manifest as emotions can be used as tools to control our thoughts, limit our freedom and of course sell us things.

screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-17-amOur Constitution guarantees freedom of the press because it’s the best way for the people to communicate with each other and their Government. When it works well it informs citizens of what they need to know to protect their personal interests, and to keep the Government accountable to the people. In principal this is a great and important part of our Republic. Unfortunately like many rights it can also lead to abuses. Much of today’s media has become a platform for retail marketing; this includes social media and with the pretense of reporting important news chooses to bombard you with constant and ever increasing vitriol. Its important to remember that you did not elect the members of the press, and while freedom of the press is crucial to our nation, it is largely a business intended to make money. If they can use fear to do that, well in my opinion, they will do that, its just good business. With twenty four hour a day, seven day a week news telling you to be afraid or angry you have to have come a long way in subduing your passions to resist. I feel I should add here that not all news media is run this way, and not all journalists are profit motivated. I wish I could say that responsible journalism was the norm but I can’t say that.

screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-29-amBecause we live such short lives it’s easy to assume this is one of the worst election cycles ever, but that is not true. The election of 1800, between Adams and Jefferson was one of the worst. Through political surrogates they both attacked each other on the most personal issues, portrayed each other in the worst light. In those days our young republic was by no means a sure bet for survival, and everyone knew it. That said, today we remember BOTH Adams and Jefferson as great presidents and patriots and use them as examples of great Americans. This is an important point to remember as we engage in political discussion today. In two hundred years subsequent generations may well wonder what all the fuss was about.

screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-41-amSo what has this got to do with Freemasonry? As I have shown in earlier blogs there are elements of our Craft handed down to us that are at least 600 years old. During those centuries we have survived many contentious times, and for the most part have emerged stronger. Operant Masonry survived the great wars over religion in England, as well as wars about the style of government. We survived the wars between England and Scotland, as well as England and France. Speculative Masonry survived the American and French revolutions, as well as the American Civil War. The lessons we learned during those periods of conflict continue to serve us today. A simple example is the prohibition against discussions of politics and religion in Lodge. How long would we have lasted as a guild and then a fraternity if open conflict over monarchy or parliament had erupted or debates between Catholic and Protestant religions? Not long I assure you. Our behavioral strategies go much further than simple prohibitions. A Masonic Lodge culture has evolved in which everyone gets to speak his mind on important decisions, and strong Masters prevent the discourse from becoming contentious and experienced Past Masters soothe ruffled feathers when the decision is made. We can do this because our core beliefs are based in four very important concepts. The first is to preserve the unity of the Craft, a brotherhood based in brotherly love. We can do this because we have as a foundation a belief in Faith, Hope and Charity. Faith in a good God, who will, if we listen, guide us to a better future and a faith in the fundamental good in all men’s hearts, Hope in a better world for ALL people, and Charity which calls all of us to extend a hand in friendship to all people in need, even in the darkest times. I don’t mean to leave you with the impression we are perfect, we are all of us imperfect ashlars seeking to improve ourselves.

screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-9-36-51-amI would call upon my brethren to remember these principals in the weeks to come, leading up to our next election. Within our Lodges we have maintained, for the most part, something becoming increasingly difficult to find in the outer world, civility. This is something we as Masons can bring to the larger world. In a time of so much passionate division, men who have learned to subdue their passions can be of crucial importance. We should counter unbridled passions in debate with reason and civility, remembering that like in Lodge when the decision is made we are still a Nation, and we must cherish that nation at least as much as our opinions. As Masons we should recognize that the United States was the first nation to adopt so many Masonic tenets and it remains the best example of the world we would create as any nation on earth. We should meet darkest despair with the light of a divine hope that permeates our Craft, and with Charity in our hearts gently remind our countrymen (and women) that each person has his or her own story that makes their beliefs valid to them. We could remind our friends and family of our shared humanity, that we all have hopes, and dreams as well a fears, no one thinks they are doing wrong.

Finally Brethren, lead through example. While you might leave the Lodge after the Volume of Sacred Law is closed, you carry your obligations in your heart. Lead by example. Become your best version of the embodiment of your obligation as an example of others. Respect the opinions of others as part of respecting their humanity. Remember that at the center of the black and white tiled floor sits the altar of Masonry. It is in balance we find our civility. It is my opinion that this is our opportunity to become ministers of civility to a world that has for now lost sight of the value of civil discourse.

God bless the United States of America, and all good Masons everywhere.

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Anatomy of the Closing Charge, part 7: The Closing Prayer

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“And now may the blessings of heaven rest upon us and all regular masons. May brotherly love prevail, and may the moral and social virtues cement us.”

In this final look at the closing charge we end the charge with prayer. First to call down the blessings of heaven upon every mason then to ask that we find love in our own brotherhood between one another, and then finally, that both good behavior and courtesy in other words civility will bind us together.

Much like we evoke the blessing of deity “when any great and important undertaking” begins, the closing charge finalizes its admonitions to the brothers in the same way. This may seem curious at first and we might ask, why not pray at the beginning of the charge? But of course, the point is, the prayer is at the end of the charge because it truly is the beginning of the masons work as he leaves the lodge for truly great and important work. The prayer is telling in that our work requires a partnership between the divine described as blessings resting on our efforts as masons here below and that indeed there is a seriousness about our work that we should not take lightly. To have divine providence rest on us is a literary way of saying that we require divine guidance, a partnership with the divine with those present and every mason around the world that has placed the lamb skin apron around him and pledged his life for those values and that more than just our mortal efforts are needed, we require the benefit of the eye of providence to watch over and guide our every action. 

9348dabfe6e6374d3697e5199d2c83f9At the conclusion of the charge we are at the door, our bag is packed, we have all our provisions, we have been given our instructions and we are setting out on our mission. “Our mission”, you ask? Yes, masonry is not JUST a social club nor a philanthropic organization, no, far from it. Masonry is that repository of ancient esoteric wisdom that has been passed to us from great minds from all ages, often at great cost, for the soul purpose of the improvement of the individual and the advancement of mankind. The father of our country, George Washington, put the mission of our craft this way when he said, “Freemasonry is founded on the immutable laws of truth and justice and its grand object is to promote the happiness of the human race.” Each of us are expected to participate in this grand object to promote happiness and add to that grand objective. That starts first in our own hearts and masonry teaches and promotes those virtues that aid the seeker in discovering love of self and love of others first in his own heart and then through his interaction with his brothers which then leads to others within his sphere of influence in the world at large.

Taking on the work within the lodge helps each mason to work both as an individuals and with others for the common good. These small tasks, from serving others by fixing the coffee, to attending a youth program, a fundraising activity, and other such activities are part of learning the responsibility which makes us better prepared for taking our “grand object” out into the bigger world. Perhaps it would be good to think of lodge as a microcosm of the world where there is a safe place to learn how to more effectively communicate, take on new challenges and responsibilities of working together making us better prepared to take those values out into the world where our example can both be seen as a preferred way of living and be seen as being the difference in our families, communities, and world at large that improves them all.

The closing charge reminds us that we are not an island, that we are a team of unique individuals with individual skills and talents who are bound together of our own free will and accord for the common good of creating a better world. This binding strengthens us, transforms us, teaches us and we become better for it, better men, useful hands in the Great Work begun so long ago by those great visionaries of the past who saw the great need in wearing the humble workers apron and have, with great courage and hope, passed on to us this work into a future world that they hoped would be enlightened, free, loving, and kind. A world much like the one we now live in due in great part to their undying efforts. Yes, there is strife and war, and violence surrounding us still, we are not blind to that unfortunate truth, but as a greater whole, we are an improved nation of good people who freely follow civil laws that keep us safe and moral laws that are motivated by love and that improvement over the darkness of the despotic past should never be lost to us. Our role as masons is to become that continuous catalyst in the world, sentinels to maintain these great ideals and values that have created the world we are free to enjoy, to promote truth that brings peace and happiness to all we encounter, to help the poor, to aid the sick, to guide the lost, and to comfort the widow and orphan, to be the light in the darkness of the world of ignorance and bring clarity to all our existence. Masonry is a force for good in the world and our closing charge is that last great reminder at the end of every meeting of WHO WE ARE.

I hope you have found this deeper, step-by-step look into the anatomy of the closing charge of value and as you stand at the alter and hear its words at your next meeting, I hope you will hear the voices of those who have echoed these sentiments from time immemorial and I hope these seven parts will help remind you of its unique importance to our craft and more especially, YOUR unique importance to not only our fraternity but to the world. The charge is that ancient sacred baton passed into your hand to carry into the next leg of the journey east. Are you ready?

 

May God add his light to this work,

Most Fraternally,

WB John Lawson

Grand Chaplain,

Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Washington.

Details for Upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight

Here are the details for the departure and arrival for the upcoming Puget Sound Honor Flight.

 

Departure from SeaTac: 9/24, Alaska 718, 8:15AM

For the sendoff, please be at upper level of the airport terminal, Door #25/Alaska Airlines area, located near Skybridge #4. Our heroes have been asked to arrive no later than 6:00AM.

 

Arrival at SeaTac 9/26 – Alaska 761, 8:15PM

The Welcome Celebration will be held on Monday the 26th in the Atrium of SeaTac Airport (located on the baggage claim level, south most end of the airport). Families are expected to start filling up the area around 7:00PM. Signs & balloons are highly encouraged.

 

Time to rally the troops! Let’s be there to send them off and to welcome them home!

*In addition, we will be hosting a small reception at the Grand Lodge Office on the 20th of September at noon to present the collected donations and thank you cards made by Job’s daughters International and International Order of Rainbow for girls Washington and Idaho.

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